Portrait of a Lady c.1700, by Michael ...

Item Ref
9155

Oil on canvas in a gilt 19th century frame.

This portrait is a fine example of the artist’s eloquent depiction of aristocratic women. In terms of both draughtmanship and pose Dahl’s female portraits are noticeably softer and gentler than Kneller’s, and thus allow for a greater versatility in the expression of feminine beauty.
Dahl’s works are frequently distinguished by a greater attention to the character of the sitter than those of his rivals, and he particularly allowed a softer aspect to the surfaces of his sitter’s costume and drapery. His colours are silvered and luminous, and there is a great charm and sensitivity in the overall expression of the sitter. In this example, the drapery and sitter’s turned head impart a subtle sense of movement. She wears the fashionable 'undress' and her hair is tied with blue silk ribbons.
This painting is absolutely typical of Dahl's highly skilled sensitive portraiture and is of great quality, allowing one to gain an insight into the character of the sitter; here the sitter looks out at the viewer with a quiet and intelligent good humour, with just a hint of seductiveness in her eyes...in every way this is a superb portrait.

MICHAEL DAHL (1659 - 1743).
Dahl was a painter of exceptional talent and regarded as the only really serious rival to Sir Godfrey Kneller, for royal patronage, during the years 1690-1714. Dahl's patterns were undoubtedly indebted to the fashion set by Kneller, but Dahl had a lighter palette, his brushwork applied in shorter and more careful strokes.
His self portrait hangs in the National Portrait Gallery and he is famed for having painted a series of wonderful female portraits for the Duke of Somerset, now at Petworth House, and known as the Petworth Beauties.
Dahl's portraits of members of the royal family hang at Kensington Palace and Windsor and other examples of his work can be found at the Tate and National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

SIZE:37 x 32 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Possibly a member of the Weldon family of Hampshire. It was in their collection since at least the 1900s when it was in the inventory compiled by Colonel Weldon.

£9,350

Portrait of a Young Lady c.1770; Attributed ...

Item Ref
8568

69A beautiful portrait of an attractive young woman, painted in the Neoclassical fashion of the second half of the eighteenth century, much favoured by Kauffman.

ANGELICA KAUFFMAN R.A. (1741—1807), in full Maria Anna Catharina Angelica Kauffman, Kauffman also spelled Kauffmann or Kaufmann, was a painter in the early Neoclassical style.

The daughter of Johann Joseph Kauffmann, a painter, Angelica was a precocious child and a talented musician and painter by her 12th year. Her early paintings were influenced by the French Rococo works of Henri Gravelot and François Boucher. In 1754 and 1763 she visited Italy, and while in Rome she was influenced by the Neoclassicism of Anton Raphael Mengs.

She was persuaded by Lady Wentworth, wife of the English ambassador, to accompany her to London in 1766. She was well received and was particularly favoured by the royal family. Sir Joshua Reynolds became a close friend, and most of the numerous portraits and self-portraits done in her English period were influenced by his style of portrait painting.
Her name is found among the signatories to the petition for the establishment of the Royal Academy, and in its first catalogue of 1769 she is listed as a member. She was one of only two women founding members.
During the 1770s Kauffmann was one of a team of artists who supplied the painted decorations for Adam-designed interiors (e.g., the house at 20 Portman Square, London, which was home to the Courtauld Institute Galleries for more than 60 years). Kauffmann retired to Rome in the early 1780s with her second husband, the Venetian painter Antonio Zucchi.

Kauffmann’s pastoral and mythological compositions portray gods and goddesses. Her paintings are Rococo in tone and approach, though her figures are given Neoclassical poses and draperies. Kauffmann’s portraits of female sitters are among her finest works.

SIZE: 27 x 23 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Anon. sale at Christie's 21 March 1975, lot 113 as by Angelica Kauffman.
Private Collection, Berkshire.

VERSO: old Christie's stencils, catalogue entry from 1975 sale.
£6,950

'The Cardinal'; a pottery bust by John ...

Item Ref
9150

A superb, and rare, artwork by John Fortnum, with a very powerful presence, it is pottery, but simulating charred wood...as if the bust had been rescued from a fire, but had been subject to great heat. It is, in appearance, timeless; it could date from the Italian Renaissance and be of wood, perhaps once painted; it could be, as it is, 33 years old...it moves effortlessly through a 600 year time span. It is a free standing 'trompe l'oeil' in that it hides its true material and presents us with a wide range of perceptions.
This is a very evocative sculpture which can inspire many messages … on art, survival, religion, life, apparent damage as enhancement....truly a very thought provoking item, as well as being a glorious sculpture.

Signed and dated '86; this is number 7 of a limited edition of 8. How many others have survived the last 33 years is not known.
"My Sculpture can be seen in some of the wildest landscapes in Britain, from the North Atlantic seascapes of the Orkney Isles to the North York Moors, where I have used the wind, rain, and oxidation as natural elements in Landscape sculpture. In my smaller more intimate sculptures the human body, with its architectural and structural aspects, is an underlying theme. I am fascinated by the alchemy of heat on materials. I enjoy using different materials and experimenting with a wide range of sculptural possibilities." John Fortnum, born 1945.
SIZE: 25.5 inches tall, 20 inches wide, 12 inches deep.
PROVENANCE: London Private Collection.
£845

Small 17th century carved giltwood mirror.

Item Ref
9134

A fine small 17th century open carved giltwood frame, containing a rectangular mirror. The frame's inner moulding is surrounded by a bold undulating ribbon entwined in scrolling acanthus leaves, which lead up from a voluted base to a crested pediment; probably Italian.

SIZE: 16 x 14 inches.
PROVENANCE: The Rintoul Collection.
£1,650

Eight pewter plates, 1680 - 1800.

Item Ref
8929

An assortment of pewter plates, triple reed, single reed rims to plain rims, dating between 1680 and 1800.
two with owner's initials to the rim.
Two of the plates are damaged..a triple reed has a piece missing to the rim and a plain rim has three cracks to the rim.
Most of the plates have touchmarks and hallmarks to the back.
SIZES: 9.25 inches to 10.50 inches.
PROVENANCE: The Blue Boar Hotel, Maldon, Essex.

NOTE: if viewing on www.royprecious.co.uk if you go to www.sellingantiques.co.uk/rp you will be able to see more images and have a zoom facility.
£525

Pair of 19th c. candlesticks

Item Ref
8037

An impressive pair of 19th c. brass candlesticks in the 18th c. style; probably originally for ecclesiastical use. Good condition, some faults.

Height 24 inches

PRICE DOES NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING
£495

18th c. French gateleg dining table

Item Ref
8239

An unusual large 18th c. double gated dropleaf French farmhouse table in chestnut of lovely colour; probably from Gascony. The split baluster legs open as supports for the leaves. Dummy drawers at each end.

Size; height 32 inches, width 50 inches, depth 82 inches open (27 inches closed).

Provenance; Private Collection, North Yorkshire Dales

NOTE - PRICE DOES NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING
£3,950

Portrait of a Gentleman 1666, Attributed to ...

Item Ref
8571

Oil on canvas; a superb quality portrait in a good 17th century carved and giltwood frame.

This powerful portrait has been known as Richard Cromwell, Oliver's third son, for many years, but, although the sitter bears a resemblance to the second Lord Protector, it is a doubtful attribution.

Looking directly and frankly at the viewer the sitter, almost certainly a military officer, makes no concession to any of the more foppish fashions of the day. He wears his own hair, not a wig, his cravat is simple. His sleeves have a silver thread pattern and over all he wears a breastplate with a buff leather coat beneath.
Although plain, all these items are of good quality...indeed, the young man must have been wealthy in order to commission such a high quality (and therefore expensive) portrait.
The different textures and appearance of all these materials, and the flesh and hair, are exquisitely painted by Hoogstraten.

Upper left, probably added in the 18th or 19th century, is the later inscription 'RICHARD CROMWELL', and to the middle right is another very faint inscription which seems to be contemporary with the portrait 'Aet. 23. Ano. 1666'.
If this date and the sitter's age are correct then it cannot be Cromwell who was born in 1626.

SAMUEL VAN HOOGSTRATEN (1627 - 1678)
Samuel van Hoogstraten was born in Dordrecht on 2 August 1627. He was first the pupil of his father, then, some time after his father's death in 1640, he entered Rembrandt's studio.
He painted genre scenes and portraits and he is well known as a specialist in perspective effects.
Hoogstraten travelled widely, visiting Rome and Vienna, where he was patronized by the Emperor. He was in London from 1662 to 1666, the time of the Great Fire.
He finally settled in his native town where he was made a Provost of the Mint. He published a book in 1678 "lnleyding tot de Hooge Schoole der Schilderkonst" (An Introduction to the Art of Painting), one of the few handbooks on painting published in Holland in that century. He died in Dordrecht on 19 October 1678.

SIZE: 29 x 23.5 inches canvas.
36.5 x 31 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Earl Granard K.P., Castle Forbes, County Longford, Ireland.(see image 6).
Private London Collection.
VERSO: Stencil "Earl of Granard KP Castle Forbes".
Hand written inscription, early 20th c. in appearance: "RICHARD CROMWELL. Painted by Robert Walker died 1659" (Unlikely attribution as the portrait is dated eight years after Walker's death.)







£23,000

Portrait of Marjorie McInnes 1921 by Cowan ...

Item Ref
8735

Oil on canvas board in a glazed modern gilt frame.
Signed and dated.
A charming portrait of Marjorie McInnies,a pretty young girl, painted in 1921, when she was four, by David Cowan Dobson.

MARJORIE MARY MCINNES OBE, (1917-2015) Marjorie was the daughter of Robert and Nettie McInnes. She had an older sister, Eileen, and a younger brother, Roy. They were born into a wealthy timber merchant family which fell upon hard times in the late 1920s. Her father died when she was ten. While she began her education at Craigholme School she completed it through a bursary at Hutcheson Girls Grammar School in 1934.

Initially she found work in a publishing house, and on leaving that got a job as a bank clerk. Her teenage years were beset by illnesses which she finally overcame.
Marjorie obtained the Diploma in Social Services from Glasgow University in 1939, there being no degree course at that time, and proceeded to train as an almoner (later called medical social worker) at the Institute of Almoners in London. She qualified in 1940. Her first posts were in 1941-42 working as an almoner at Hull Royal Infirmary, Stafford Royal Infirmary and as a caseworker at Greenock Social Services Council. These were all locum posts.
For a brief period in 1942-43 she worked in Southport, but on hearing that her brother, who was in the RAF, had been killed over France she returned to Scotland. From November 1943 to May 1948 Marjorie was almoner at Hairmyres Hospital, East Kilbride. She was exempt from war service as this hospital had a military wing but she was active as a volunteer in civil defence.

One of Marjorie’s great achievements was the work she undertook between the years 1949-52 as one of the social work representatives on the Cope Report, set up to establish a register for all medical auxiliaries. Marjorie and her colleague objected vehemently to almoners being included as auxiliaries and were finally successful in the establishment of social work as a separate profession.

During the years 1948-1953 Marjorie held the post of Head Almoner at the Victoria Infirmary in Glasgow and from 1954-57 was Head Almoner at Western Infirmary, Glasgow. During this period she also had a part-time teaching post in the University Department of Public Health and Social Medicine.
In 1969 Marjorie was appointed Deputy Chief Social Work Adviser within the Central Advisory Service of Social Work Services Group.
She held this post with great distinction and was held in the highest regard by all her ?colleagues throughout the Scottish Office.

Her retirement at the age of 61 in 1978 was the commencement of a new career serving within the Scottish voluntary sector. She contributed another two decades of guidance and oversight to many major Scottish charities. It was the recognition of her work as Convener of the Scottish Council on Disability which led to her being honoured by the Queen in the New Year’s Honours List for 1982.
Marjorie’s Christian faith enriched everything she did and achieved. She was a lifelong member of Adelaide Place Baptist Church – where she served as Deacon and subsequently Honorary Deacon – and also the wider denomination of the Baptist Union of Scotland through the Scottish Baptist College. In 1990 she was elected President of the Union – the only woman to have achieved this position.
(Our thanks to Patricia Leary for information on Marjorie)

DAVID COWAN DOBSON (1894–1980), referred to as 'Cowan' Dobson, Associate of the Society of Royal British Artists (1919),Member of the Society of Royal British Artists (1922), Member of the Royal Society of Portrait Sainters (1963); he was a leading Scottish portrait artist who painted with bravado and style, and in this intimate portrait there is a painterly delight in the handling of the medium - the brushwork to the dress very fast and impressionistic.

SIZE:25 x 21 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Scottish Private Collection.
£1,850

Portrait of Captain Mackinley c.1830, by Sir ...

Item Ref
9165

Oil on canvas in the original very fine frame.
This is an excellent portrait typical of the period; the handsome sitter has a fashionable brooding, Byronic look, with the dark background enhancing the drama and encouraging the viewer to concentrate on the sitter's face.

The sitter is thought to be Thomas George MacKinley (1809-1865); he was the son of John Mackinley and Maria Cates. Born in London, he was an officer in the Royal Navy, becoming a captain in July 1830.
The Mackinleys are related by marriage to the eminent Copeman and Boord families with connections to Wakehurst Place, Sussex.

SIR WILLIAM BEECHEY RA (12 December 1753 – 28 January 1839) was a leading English portraitist during the golden age of British painting. Beechey was admitted to the Royal Academy Schools in 1772, where he is thought to have studied under Johan Zoffany. He first exhibited at the Academy in 1776. His earliest surviving portraits are small-scale full-length and conversation pieces which are reminiscent of Zoffany. In 1782, he moved to Norwich, where he gained several commissions, including a portrait of Sir John Wodehouse and a series of civic portraits for St. Andrew's Hall, Norwich. By 1787, he had returned to London, and in 1789, he exhibited a celebrated portrait of John Douglas, Bishop of Carlisle (now in Lambeth Palace). Beechey’s career during this period is marked by a succession of adept and restrained portraits in the tradition of Sir Joshua Reynolds.
In 1793, he was commissioned to paint a full-length portrait of Queen Charlotte and subsequently named as her official portrait painter. That same year, he was elected as an associate member of the Royal Academy. Following his royal appointment, the number of royal commissions he undertook increased markedly, and in 1797 he exhibited six royal portraits. In 1798, he was elected a full member of the Royal Academy and painted George III and the Prince of Wales Reviewing Troops for that year’s academy’s exhibition. This enormous composition depicts King George III, the Prince of Wales and staff officers on horseback at an imagined cavalry review in Hyde Park. The king was reported to be delighted with the painting and rewarded Beechey with a knighthood.[ Joseph Farington's Diaries give many accounts of Beechey's relations with the royal family during this period, including his temporary fall from favour in 1804, which Farington attributes to the vagaries of George III’s mental condition.
Beechey's portraits of the turn of the century are considered to be his most lively. They are closer to the flamboyant and free techniques employed by his younger rivals, John Hoppner and Sir Thomas Lawrence.
Royal patronage resumed in around 1813, when Beechey was appointed portrait painter to Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester, and culminated with his appointment in 1830 as principal portrait painter to King William IV. In 1836, Beechey retired to Hampstead and on 9-11 June that year, the contents of his studio along with his collection were sold at Christie’s.
Although capable of impetuousness and irascibility, Beechey was known for his generosity to students. In particular, he took a close interest in the career of the young John Constable.
SIZE: 37.25 x 32 x 3.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: By descent to the estate of the Copeman family.
VERSO: faded old paper label and a copperplate inscription "Painted by Sir William Beechey".
£7,950

Huge Chinese blue and white bowl.

Item Ref
8809

This is an absolutely spectacular ceramic; the skill needed to pot such a large bowl is great.
Over 2 foot in diameter, 9.5 inches deep and of considerable weight this is a commanding piece.
Beautifully hand painted with lotus and chrysanthemum scrolls; lotus conveys the notion of happiness in maturity, creative power, genius and marital happiness; the chrysanthemum represents autumn, joviality and a life of ease.
The bold decoration, with cresting waves and the lotus and chrysanthemum are in the 15th century style of the Ming Dynasty, although they were revived in the 18th century under the Emperor Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty.
This bowl, superb as it is, is neither of those. Dating only from the late 20th century it is a homage by a modern potter to the masters of the past.
As can easily be seen on this website we deal in fine antique items, not reproduction items....however, this bowl is so magnificent that an exception was made; although not old it is a fine art object. If it were what it appears to be it would be of immense value. We make no apology for its inclusion...it would enhance any room.
DIMENSIONS: 25 inches in diameter. 9.5 inches tall.
£1,650

Pewter charger c.1720.

Item Ref
8927

A large Queen Anne or George I singlr reed rim pewter charger, 18 inches in diameter.
Original owner's initials to the rim, E.B.(?).


SIZE: 18 inches diameter.
PROVENANCE:The Blue Boar Hotel, Maldon, Essex.
£195