home   ●  latest stock  ●  view all   ●  delivery   ●  testimonials   ●  contact us  
Our website was last updated on: 22 June 2017
 
(B) PORTRAITS SOLD
first   «   4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13   »  last


SOLD....Portrait of a Young Nobleman c.1630; Studio or Circle of Daniel Mytens.
Oil on canvas in carved and giltwood frame.

This is a fine portrait of a young aristocrat painted in the typical swagger pose favoured by Mytens for his noble sitters (v. his portraits of Richard Rich, Earl of Warwick, King Charles I, and William Knollys, Earl of Banbury among others).
Yet despite the aristocratic posture the artist manages to sensitively convey a sense of a slight insecurity in the boy as he is painted, perhaps for the first time, as a man.
His identity is, as yet, unknown, but his expensive and fashionable clothes are of the Court.

Daniël Mijtens (Delft, c. 1590 – The Hague, 1647/48), known in England as DANIEL MYTENS the Elder, was a Dutch portrait painter who spent the central years of his career working in England. He was born in Delft into a family of artists and trained in The Hague, possibly in the studio of Van Mierevelt.

By 1618, he had moved to London where his initial patron was the leading art collector Thomas Howard, 21st Earl of Arundel. Mytens painted the Earl and his Countess, and was soon commissioned to paint King James I and his son Charles, Prince of Wales. In 1625 he became painter to King Charles I.

After the prince's accession to the throne as Charles I in 1625 Mytens produced such a large number of full length portraits of Charles I and his courtiers, including duplicates, that it is assumed that he had workshop assistance. Mytens made visits to the Netherlands in 1626 and 1630, perhaps to study the latest developments in his field, more particularly the works of Rubens and Van Dyck.

Mytens introduced a new naturalism into the English court portrait, but after the arrival in England of Anthony Van Dyck in 1632 he was superseded as the leading court portraitist, and around 1634 he appears to have returned to the Netherlands permanently.
Some of Mytens' works are still owned by the Royal Family.

SIZE: 51 x 42 inches inc. replica frame.

PROVENANCE:
with the Simon Carter Gallery in 1990;
London Collection of Severin Wunderman.

SEVERIN WUNDERMAN Born Brussels, 1938.
Died Nice, 2008.A child Holocaust survivor he built up a multi-million pound business in luxury watches and became a major art collector and philanthropist. In the 1970s he set up watch production for Gucci, which he ran and controlled for over 25 years until Gucci Timepieces was bought back by the family in 1998.

Diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer in the 1990s, he promised the specialist, who was reluctant to treat him, $5 million a year in research funding for every year he survived.
This resulted in the Severin Wunderman Family Foundation for research into incurable illnesses. He eventually died from a stroke.
He was a board member of Steven Spielberg's Shoah Foundation and received the Légion d'Honneur in 2005.

This portrait hung in the hall of his London house until his death. Wunderman also owned a French Chateau in the Cote d`Azur and a penthouse in Los Angeles.
Ref: 8531
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Mary, Queen of Scots, Manner of Federico Zuccaro.
Oil on canvas in a 17th century Italian ebonised and parcel gilt frame with gold lettering 'Mary Queen of Scots. Zuccaro'. To the left of the sitter the faint inscription 'A.D. 1561. Aetatis 19'.

This beautiful portrait is in the manner of Federico Zuccaro, in it the queen wears magnificent jewels and a gold and silver encrusted dress to emphasise her royalty, wealth and power. The quality of the painting of this opulence is superb, and contrasts perfectly with the sensitive depiction of the sitter's youthful face.

This image dates from the late 17th or early 18th century when, after the Stuarts came to power with the accession of Mary's son James I, a process of history rewriting took place.
Mary had been called an adulteress and traitor by the English and was beheaded for plotting to assassinate her cousin Elizabeth I,but under the Stuarts she was presented as a beautiful and religious princess unjustly executed for her Catholic faith.

All through the 17th c (and later) portraits of Mary were created; this one shows her, rather idealised, at the age of 19 in 1561 when she returned to Scotland after the death of her husband King Francis II of France.
 

MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS (born as Mary Stewart and known in French as Marie Stuart; 1542 – 1587), was Scottish queen regnant from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567. In the lists of Scottish sovereigns, she is recognized as Mary I. (Not to be confused with Mary I of England.) Her great-great-granddaughter was Mary II of England.
She was the only surviving legitimate child of King James V. She was six days old when her father died and she was crowned nine months later. In 1558, she married Francis, Dauphin of France, who ascended the French throne as Francis II in 1559. Mary was not Queen of France for long; she was widowed on 5 December 1560. After her husband's death, Mary returned to Scotland, arriving in Leith on 19 August 1561. Four years later, she married her first cousin, Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley. Their union was unhappy and in February 1567, there was a huge explosion at their house, and Darnley was found dead, apparently strangled, in the garden.
She soon married James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell, who was generally believed to be Darnley's murderer. Following an uprising against the couple, Mary was imprisoned in Loch Leven Castle on 15 June and forced to abdicate in favour of her one-year-old son, James VI. After an unsuccessful attempt to regain the throne, Mary fled to England seeking protection from her first cousin once removed, Queen Elizabeth I, whose kingdom she hoped to inherit. Elizabeth ordered her arrest because of the threat presented by Mary, who had previously claimed Elizabeth's throne as her own and was considered the legitimate sovereign of England by many English Catholics, including participants in the Rising of the North. After 19 years in custody in a number of castles and manor houses in England, she was tried and executed for treason for her involvement in three plots to assassinate Elizabeth.
When Elizabeth died childless in 1603, Mary's son James VI of Scotland became James I of England. (James was a descendant of Henry VII of England through his great-grandmother Margaret Tudor, older sister of Henry VIII.)

FEDERICO ZUCCARO, also known as Federico Zuccari (c. 1542/1543 - July 20, 1609), was an Italian Mannerist painter and architect, active in Italy and other European countries.
In 1574 he came to England, where he received commissions to paint the portrait of Queen Elizabeth, Mary, Queen of Scots, Sir Nicholas Bacon, Sir Francis Walsingham, Lord High Admiral Howard, and others.

SIZE: 36 x 32 inches inc. frame
PROVENANCE: Niel Rimington Collection, Fonthill
Old Abbey, Tisbury, Wiltshire

Verso: old hadwritten label 'Sir T..... H. Stev...'
Ref: 8532
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of a Gentleman of the Weaver family, c.1590-1610, British School.
Oil on canvas. To the left the coat of arms of the Weaver family, dated by the College of Arms as those in use from 1568 to 1635.
To the right, the number 28, almost certainly the age of the sitter.
The portrait sits within a good, distressed, black and gilt 'cassetta' frame.

This charming naïve portrait would have been painted by an itinerant painter moving from town to town. Self taught, they made portraits of the local gentry, and also painted inn signs.
Elizabethan and Jacobean 'primitive' portraits are very rare indeed as few have survived; they have a real directness and sense of period, as well as being highly decorative.

In all Elizabethan portraiture, including that of the Court, the image was always iconic, symbolising power, wealth and lineage and all these factors are present in this limner painting.
The family's heraldry is proudly emblazoned to the left and the sitter's expensive clothing and sword and dagger are shown whilst he holds his gloves in his right hand.
Weapons show that this is a gentleman, legally entitled to bear arms, and the gloves were a very expensive item and very important in Elizabethan upper class society being used as gifts, love tokens and even to issue a challenge.

Naïve though this portrait is the untutored artist has managed to capture a real sense of this young man's strong character; his eyes look directly at the viewer, with just a hint of the poetic melancholy so fashionable at the time.

The WEAVER FAMILY were of Norman extraction; they came to England in 1066 and were in Wales before 1200.
Humphrey Weaver was the first to use the Weaver name in c.1265 in Radnorshire, Wales.
The family were, for centuries, to be found principally in the three counties bordering Wales, viz. Cheshire, Shropshire and Herefordshire, but were also in London.
Their name was taken from the Manor of Weever, near Middlewick, Cheshire, held by the service of providing two fully equipped men-at-arms to help garrison Aldford Castle for forty days in time of war. They had a chapel in the churchyard of Middlewick, of which nothing remains, and the manor was sold in 1720 to the Wilbraham family by the Stanleys of Alderley Park, into whose possession it had come by descent.

A branch of the family moved to America in 1590 – Clement Weaver was settled in Waterton, Massachusetts by 1635.
Thomas Weaver, Attorney General in the Leeward Islands, West Indies became governor of Fort James in the Gambia, Africa where he was killed during a French raid in 1705.
Samuel Weaver became a freeman of the city of New York, April 10 1722.

SIZE: 30 x 24 inches unframed
42 x 36 inches framed

PROVENANCE: By repute, by descent through the family;
Welsh Private Collection since 1999.
Ref: 8533
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Mariya Andreevna Kozlovskaya 1954, by Boris Korniev
Oil on sackcloth in simple black wood frame.

Boris Korniev (Russian, 1922-1973).
Portrait of the artist's wife, Mariya Andreevna Kozlovskaya. It was this painting, exhibited in the Leningrad Summer Exhibition of 1954, that earned Boris his place as a Member of the Artist's Union.
Signed and dated '54 (in Cyrillic, lower right); inscribed verso.

MARIYA ANDREEVNA KOZLOVSKAYA (born 1925) met her husband, Boris Korniev, at the Russian Academy of Arts, Repin, where they were both students. They married in 1949 and both graduated from the Academy in 1952. In the present portrait, she wears the same clothing that she wore on her graduation day.

Mariya is herself a successful artist, having exhibited at over 100 exhibitions within Russia and abroad. She was elected to the Artist's Union in 1954. She currently lives in St. Petersburg, where she shares a studio with her son, also an artist. Mariya (also known as Marina) is regarded as one of the most talented representatives of the Leningrad School of painting.

BORIS VASIILIEVICH KORNIEV (1922-1973) In 1938 he finished at Leningrad Art School. During the World War ll (called by the Russians The Great Patriotic War) Boris served in the army being awarded many medals for gallantry.
In 1945 he attended Leningrad Art College for a year then from 1946-1952 he studied at the Repin Academy under Professor Viktor Oreshnikov; he was a pupil of Boris Fogel, Genrikh Pavlovsky, Semion Abugov and Andrey Mylnikov.
In 1949, at the Academy, Boris met and married Mariya, both graduating in 1952. Boris was awarded the Gold Medal for his Diploma painting of 1952.

There were no studios available for the newlyweds so they lived with one mother and then the other; they painted each other's portraits at this time. This portrait of Mariya was in the Summer Exhibition in 1954 where it was seen by the Director of the Artist's Union; he was so impressed with it he invited Boris to become a member.
He painted portraits, landscapes and still lifes, showing work in numerous important exhibitions including the famous 'Soviet Russia' exhibition in Moscow 1960.
Member of the LCRAU in 1954, from 1962 Boris taught at the Repin Academy, (in the last year of his life he was made Professor of the Academy), Honoured Artist of the Russian Federation 1965. His work is in the Russian State Museum at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, the Tretyakov State Gallery and in public and private collections world wide. He died on 24 December 1973.

LITERATURE: 'Boris Korniev. Paintings. Exhibition catalogue, Leningrad: Khudozhnik RSFSR 1975.'

' Unknown Socialist Realism. The Leningrad School.' St. Petersburg: NP-Print 2007. This book is the first on the history of the Leningrad School, one of the brightest and significant phenomena in Soviet art from 1930-1980.
This portrait is reproduced full page on page 46.

SIZE: (canvas) 41 inches x 32 1/2 inches.

PROVENANCE:
Boris Korniev and Mariya Kozlovskaya;
Sold by Mariya in 2007 to Percy Barkes, UK dealer in Russian Art ;
English Private Collection.
Ref: 8534
This item has been sold




Portrait of Nell Gwyn c.1670; Circle or Studio of Lely (UK, c. 1670)
Oil on canvas in oval giltwood frame.
A beautiful painting of the famous actress and courtesan.
Inscribed upper left 'Mistress Eleanora Gwin'

The face is particularly sensitively painted in contrast to the rest of the body, and especially the drapery in which the paint is used with an artistic freedom and delight in the use of the medium. This works very well in drawing the attention of the viewer to the features of the sitter.
The historical importance and attractiveness of the sitter make this a most engaging portrait.

Portraits of prominent subjects of their day, especially Royal and Court sitters, were in much demand after the Restoration. Lely’s many talented studio assistants and members of his Circle were regularly occupied in making highly accomplished copies.

NELL GWYN (Gwin, Gwynn or Gwynne) was born Eleanor Gwyn (2 Feb. 1650 - 14 Nov. 1687).
Charles II's famous mistress ('pretty witty Nell' in Pepys's words) began life as an orange seller in the Theatre Royal, where she was befriended by Charles Hart and John Lacy, the players. In 1665 she appeared for the first time on the stage as Cydraria in Dryden's 'Indian Emperor'.
Pepys greatly admired her, and she continued in numerous roles by Dryden and others until she quitted the stage in 1682. Dryden wrote parts especially for her, taking advantage in particular of her gift for delivering prologues and epilogues. Nell became extremely famous and was much in favour with the public.

After she had recited an epilogue in a hat 'of the circumference of a large coach-wheel', Charles II approached her and took her back in his coach to supper. Much of her popularity as the King's mistress lay in the unpopularity of the Catholic Duchess of Portsmouth, her main rival. It is said that when mobbed in Oxford by a crowd who mistook her for her rival, Nell leant out of her coach and said: 'Pray good people be civil; I am the Protestant whore'.
Madame de Sevigne noted the rivalry and said of Nell Gwyn: 'She is young, indiscreet, confident, wild and of an agreeable humour: she sings, she dances, she acts her part with a good grace.'
She had two sons by the King and the eldest, Charles, was created Duke of St Albans. The King assigned Burford House in Windsor to her. She died aged 37 and is buried in the Church of St. Martin's in the Fields, at the corner of Trafalgar Square.

SIR PETER LELY (1618 - 1680) was the dominant Court and Society portraitist of the reign of Charles ll. He was made Principal Painter to the King in 1661, and knighted in 1680.

SIZE: 35 x 25 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE:
James Duff, 2nd Earl of Fife (1729-1809);
Rt. Hon. Lord Saltoun of Abernathy;
Christie's London, 13 October 1950 (lot 23);
The late Dr. William Lindsay Gordon.
Ref: 8515
This item has been sold





SOLD...Portrait of Queen Henrietta Maria; Follower of Van Dyck
Oil on canvas in 18th c. giltwood frame.

A beautiful portrait of Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I, by a Follower of Van Dyck, late 17th c./18th c.
The portrait is not an exact copy of any known Van Dyck portrait of the queen, but is clearly based on Van Dyck's work.

HENRIETTA MARIA of France (1609 – 1669) was the Queen consort of England, Scotland and Ireland as the wife of King Charles I. She was mother of two kings, Charles II and James II and grandmother of two queens and one king, Mary II, William III and Anne of Great Britain as well as paternal aunt of Louis XIV of France.

Her Catholic religion made her unpopular in England, and also prohibited her from being crowned in an Anglican service; therefore she never had a coronation. She began to immerse herself in national affairs as civil war loomed on the horizon, when the English Civil War began in 1642, Henrietta Maria was in Europe.
She returned to England in 1643 when she landed in Yorkshire with troops. She joined up with Royalist forces in the north and made her headquarters in York. She moved to Oxford to be with Charles but fled to France in July 1644 following the birth of her youngest daughter, Henrietta Anne when the position of the Royalists looked bleak; here she remained along with her sons.

Her husband's execution in 1649 was a terrible blow. She brought up her youngest child Henrietta in her own faith, but her efforts to persuade her youngest son, the Duke of Gloucester, to take the same course only produced discomfort in the exiled family.
The story of her marriage with her attached servant Lord Jermyn needs more confirmation than it has yet received to be accepted, but all the information which has reached us of her relations with her children points to the estrangement which had grown up between them.
After the Restoration she returned to England when she found that she had no place in the new world. She received from Parliament a grant of £30,000 a year in compensation for the loss of her dower-lands, and the King added a similar sum as a pension from himself.
In January 1661 she returned to France to be present at the marriage of her daughter Henrietta to the Duke of Orleans.
In July 1662 she set out again for England, and took up her residence once more at Somerset House. Her health failed her, and on the 24th of June 1665, she departed in search of the clearer air of her native country.
She died on the 31st of August 1666, at Colombes, not far from Paris.

SIZE: Canvas 28 x 23 inches (old extension top and right)
Framed 33.5 x 25.25 inches

PROVENANCE:
Printed label verso 'DASHWOOD HEIRLOOM No. 74'. Old handwritten label 'Lord Lansdens(?) 7'.

Presumably by descent to John Vernon of Wherstead Park (1776-1818) from his uncle General Charles Vernon (1719-1810) "all my family pictures together with all those of Royal Personages to be kept and preserved by him as heirlooms".
By inheritance at Wherstead Park, to his sister
Lady Harland (née Arethusa Vernon) (1777-1860), wife of Sir Richard Harland, Bt. (d. 1848), Wherstead Park,
to her first cousin Charles Vernon, formerly Charles Jenkin (1790-1863), Wherstead Park, and by inheritance to
Charles Edmund Dashwood (1857-1935), Wherstead Park, Ipswich ('The Dashwood Heirlooms'); Christie's, London, 26 June 1914.
Christie's London 20 October 1967 £84
Christie's London 29 January 1988 £1050







Ref: 8536
This item has been sold




SOLD......Portrait of a Young Gentleman c.1740; English School
Oil on canvas in an 18th c. giltwood frame.

A pleasing mid 18th century portrait of a good-looking young man painted by an unknown artist; probably one of the many intinerant painters who travelled the country painting the lesser gentry and prosperous mercantile classes.
However, this portrait is well above average for its type, the face is sensitively painted and with a real feeling of the nature of the sitter; all in all a very attractive early Georgian portrait.

SIZE: 31.75 x 28.25 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: by descent in the south of England.

Verso: old label of "White & Co. Ltd., Furniture Depositories. Bournemouth depot: branches in Portsmouth, Southampton, Winchester and London.
Client's name 'Mrs. Cowland'."
Ref: 8537
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Nicholas Fortescue,1627; English School
Oil on canvas in a period 'cassetta' frame.

Portrait of Nicholas Fortescue, aged 31, three quarter length in a brown slashed doublet, white lace collar and cuffs, with sword and arquebus support. The sitter wears the metal gorget of an officer which contrasts with the very expensive 'reticella' lace he also wears.

The arquebus (sometimes spelled harquebus or hackbut) was a primitive firearm used in the 15th to 17th centuries. Like its successor, the musket, it was a smoothbore firearm although somewhat smaller than its predecessors, which made it easier to carry.The arquebus was fired by a matchlock mechanism and the arquebusier supported the gun's barrel with a pole with a forked end when firing.

Fortescue was born in East Allington in 1596; his father was Edmund Fortescue, born 1552, and his mother, Mary (Maria) Champernoune, born 1567.
Their ancestor Sir Richard le Fort came to England with William the Conqueror and was given the name Fort Escue (strong shield) through having protected Duke William with his shield at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

The family resided at East Allington in South Devon for many generations; their arms are displayed in the village church of St. Andrew.

SIZE: 38 x 35.5 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE: By descent through the Fortescue family to the late Mrs Charles Steuart.
Then to a private collection in an East Anglian
Georgian country house.

With the portrait comes a printout of the the Fortescue family tree from the Norman Conquest to the mid 17th century. Extracted from 'The Visitations of the County of Devon' by Lt. Col. J.L. Vivian, 1895.

Ref: 8537a
This item has been sold





SOLD...Portrait of Nell Gwyn c.1675; Studio of Lely
Oil on canvas in fine carved and giltwood 'Lely' frame.
SIR PETER LELY (1618 - 1680) was the dominant Court and Society portraitist of the reign of Charles ll. He was made Principal Painter to the King in 1661, and knighted in 1680.

Many portraits of unknown Restoration ladies are said to be Nell Gwyn, on no grounds at all. It is rare for one to be unquestionably of the actress, as this one is. This studio work is identical to the prime version painted by Lely and formerly at Parham Park, Collection of the Hon. Clive Gibson, and sold at Sotheby's 15 June 2000 for £57,500.

Portraits of prominent subjects of their day, especially Royal and Court sitters, were in much demand after the Restoration. Lely’s many talented studio assistants, among them Greenhill and Lankrink, were regularly occupied in making highly accomplished copies under Lely's supervision.

Nell looks confidentally at the viewer, her decollatage very revealing, as was the custom for portraits of mistresses. To her right, in an urn, grows Spanish Jasmine which signifies sensuality, and was famous for its exotic heady perfume which is especially intoxicating at night....all very appropriate.

NELL GWYN (or Gwynn or Gwynne) was born Eleanor Gwyn (2 Feb. 1650 - 14 Nov. 1687). Charles II's famous mistress ('pretty witty Nell' in Pepys's words) began life as an orange seller in the Theatre Royal, where she was befriended by Charles Hart and John Lacy, the players. Hart assisted her theatrical training and in 1665 she appeared for the first time on the stage as Cydraria in Dryden's 'Indian Emperor'
Pepys greatly admired her, and she continued in numerous roles by Dryden and others until she quitted the stage in 1682. Dryden wrote parts especially for her, taking advantage in particular of her gift for delivering prologues and epilogues. After she had recited an epilogue in a hat 'of the circumference of a large coach-wheel', Charles II approached her and took her back in his coach to supper. Much of her popularity as the King's mistress lay in the unpopularity of the Catholic Duchess of Portsmouth, her main rival. It is said that when mobbed in Oxford by a crowd who mistook her for her rival, Nell leant out of her coach and said: 'Pray good people be civil; I am the Protestant whore'. Madame de Sevigne noted the rivalry and said of Nell Gwyn: 'She is young, indiscreet, confident, wild and of an agreeable humour: she sings, she dances, she acts her part with a good grace.' She had two sons by the King and the eldest, Charles, was created Duke of St Albans. The King assigned Burford House in Windsor to her.
She died aged 37 and is buried in the Church of St. Martin's in the Fields, at the corner of Trafalgar Square.
SIZE: 49.5 x 39.5 inches canvas size; 58 x 47.75 inches inc. frame.
CONDITION: very good; old relining; moderate craquleure; small areas of old retouching. The superb frame is a hand-made copy of a 'Lely' frame of the late 17th c., custom made, covered in 22 ct. gold leaf and then 'antiqued'. PROVENANCE: By descent in Ireland since at least c.1800 to the previous owner
This item has been sold




SOLD....Portrait of Marie Mancini by Jacob Ferdinand Voet
SOLD...Oil on canvas in a carved and giltwood Louis XIV style frame.

This beautiful portrait shows Voet's skill at its finest; sensitive, sensual, insightful and with a real sense of the sitter's presence.

Although the stretchers are inscribed with the name Marie Anne Mancini, Duchesse de Bouillon, the portrait is far more likely to be Marie Mancini (Anna Maria Mancini).
The name Pierre Mignard is also inscribed but the artist is without doubt Jacob Voet.

MARIE MANCINI, Princess Colonna and Vicerein of Naples and Aragon (Anna Maria Mancini; 1639�1715) was the middle of the five Mancini sisters, nieces to Cardinal Mazarin who were brought to France to marry advantageously. "Dark, vivacious and beautiful,"(Sir Oliver Millar) Marie captured the biggest prize of the French court: the love of Louis XIV.
Marie did not consummate her relationship with the Sun King. His love for her was a somewhat idealistic one, but he was so besotted that he wanted to marry. Eventually, Cardinal Mazarin and Anne of Austria separated the couple, banishing Marie into exile and arranging Louis' marriage to his cousin, Maria Theresa of Spain.
In 1661, Marie was married off to the Italian Prince Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna, who remarked after their wedding night that he was surprised to find her a virgin as one does not normally expect to find 'innocence among the loves of kings'. (from Antonia Fraser's book 'Love and Louis XIV'). They had three children, all sons. After the birth of her third child, relations between Marie and her husband deteriorated. On May 29, 1672, fearing that he would kill her, Marie left Rome accompanied by her sister Hortense.
In 1677, in order to support herself, she wrote her memoirs. She did not return to Italy until her husband's death in 1689. She died in Pisa and is buried in the church of the Holy Sepulchre there.

JACOB FERDINAND VOET (1639 - c.1700) was a Flemish painter who made his career in Rome in the second half of the 17th century. He was an expert portrait painter who combined solid Flemish professionalism with stylistic features from French and Italian Baroque portraiture. Little is known of Voet's early life in Antwerp. He arrived in Rome in 1663, probably via France. Voet became a much sought-after portrait painter to the Papal court and the Roman aristocracy. Voet specialized in half-length portraits, in which all attention is concentrated on the subject, who emerges from a neutral, dark background. He was a sophisticated master of his medium, painting with an effortless accuracy and a fluid ease. Voet's subjects tend to have very striking, memorable eyes, always large and evocative.
SIZE: 17.75 x 15 inches (unframed) 23 x 21 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: French private collection. Verso: red wax collector's seal, probably 18th c. Various incorrect inscriptions, most likely early 20th c.
This item has been sold



 
first   «   4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13   »  last