Portrait of Radcliffe Pearle Todd c.1780; Circle ...

Item Ref
8708

Oil on canvas in period giltwood frame.

This charming late Georgian portrait, of intimate size, shows Radcliffe Pearle Todd (1762-1813) of Sturmer Hall, Haverhill, Suffolk. (See Image 4). This estate had been in the family since c. 1595.

He was the son of Radcliffe Pearle Todd and his wife Elizabeth Strutt. (portrait also on this website).
This young Radcliffe married, firstly, Sarah Elizabeth Massingberd of Gunby and, secondly, Sarah Ingle.
His son by Sarah Elizabeth was also, confusingly, called Radcliffe Pearle Todd.

JOHN FRANCIS RIGAUD (1742-1810) was a painter of portraits, history and decorative pieces. Born in Italy of French descent, he was mainly active in England. He trained in his native Turin as well as Florence and Bologna and moved to London in 1771. Rigaud's major patron was Heneage Finch, 4th Earl of Aylesford, for whom he decorated the Pompeian Gallery at Packington Hall, Warwickshire, in 1787. He was a member of the art academies in Bologna and London.

SIZE: 21 x 19 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: by direct descent in the family.
SOLD

SOLD....Portrait of a Young Woman as Selene, ...

Item Ref
8679

Oil on canvas in modern giltwood frame, signed, bottom right, 'MULLER MELA.'

This exquisite portrait of a beautiful young woman depicts her as Selene, the Moon Goddess.

Shown in profile, with closed eyes, the sitter conveys a feeling of tranquility and an intriguing sense of both the erotic and the innocent.
Moonstones in her hair represent the stars, the gleaming robe of the Milky Way is around her and she holds a corn plant... vitally important as a constituent of bread - the staff of life. Corn also symbolised plenty.

In Greek mythology Selene was the daughter of Hyperion and Theia, the sister of Helios the Sun God and Eos the Dawn.
Selene, "the eternally beautiful", is one of the triple goddesses of the Moon: Artemis - the waxing moon, Selene - the full moon, and Hecate - the waning moon.

Selene is the mother goddess...a symbol of womanhood, and is represented by the full moon, where she is at the height of her reproductive potential.
Known to the Romans as Luna, she is responsible for the germination of seeds and new crops.
The days of the full and new moon were set aside for her worship.
The calenders and rituals of her worship helped people to measure time to know when it was best for planting and harvesting.

Appropriately for a goddess who represents the life force she was known for her many love affairs.
The moonstone is her gem and her colour is silver, grey white.

MELA (MELANIE) MULLER was born in Budapest in 1879 and died in 1933.
At the present there is little information available on this talented Hungarian painter and her works seem to be very rare.

SIZE: 33 x 29.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:
*Sold Sotheby's, lot 144, 4 May 1988.
*Hampshire Private Collection.


SOLD

SOLD....Portrait of a Young Lady c.1730; Attributed ...

Item Ref
8604

Oil on canvas in early 19th c. gilt frame.

This fine portait of a young woman has a real Baroque swagger to it; the lady seems almost to be moving across the canvas, her silken robe billowing behind her.
The material of her gown and robe have the expensive-looking rather metallic sheen associated with Highmore's treatment of material.
The sitter looks directly at the viewer with confidence and candour.
The veins of her left hand can be seen faintly shown in blue; at this period, and earlier, for a woman to have a semi-translucent skin and bue veins showing was considered very attractive and well bred...hence the expression 'blue-blood' for members of the aristocracy.

JOSEPH HIGHMORE (1692 - 1780) was born in London, on June 13th 1692. He was the third son of Edward and Mary (Tull) Highmore. His father was a coal merchant in Thames Street. He was articled as clerk to an attorney in 1707, but his ambition was always to paint, and he studied for two years at the academy founded by Sir Godfrey Kneller in Great Queen Street.

Beginning as a professional portrait painter in 1715, he gained clients from the City merchants who approved of what they perceived to be his ability to convey likeness and character without ostentation. He married in 1716, and a move in 1723 to a house in Lincoln's Inn Field marked his growing business and prosperity.
By the 1730s his style had become more polished and sophisticated.

Highmore's contribution to a folio of engravings relating to the Order of the Bath and its ceremonies obtained him a number of commissions from the Knights of the Order.
His series of paintings in illustration of Samuel Richardson's novel "Pamela" and small, full-length, single and group portraits of the same period and style, were his principal achievement of the 1740s. As a result of the paintings, Highmore became a close friend of Richardson, and not only painted illustrations for Richardson's other novels, but also portrayed the novelist himself.
Highmore retired as a painter in 1761 and left London to live with his family at Canterbury in 1762. He died at Canterbury, on March 3rd, 1780.

SIZE:45 x 36.75 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Southern England.
SOLD

SOLD....Double Portrait of a Lady and Child ...

Item Ref
8638

Oil on canvas (now mounted on board) in reproduction gilt frame.

An attractive and well painted double portrait of a mother and child painted in the Regency period; the mother, dressed very fashionably, looks out with a quiet pride.
Meanwhile the infant, rather touchingly, waves at the viewer from across the centuries. The fact that the identities of the sitters are unknown and we do not even know the gender of the child somehow renders the portrait more poignant.

The father of the child, husband of the lady, a legal gentleman, is also on this website, our ref: 8635.

RAMSAY RICHARD REINAGLE, (19 March 1775 - 17 November 1862) was an English portrait, landscape, and animal painter, and son of Philip Reinagle, he was a pupil of his father, whose style he followed. He exhibited at the Royal Academy as early as 1788. He afterwards went to Italy, and was studying in Rome in 1796. Subsequently he visited Holland in order to study from the Dutch masters.
Reinagle exhibited portraits and landscapes in oil at the Royal Academy, of which he became an associate in 1814, and an academician in 1823.

PLEASE NOTE: There is also similarity to the work of the American artist REMBRANDT PEALE (1778-1860). Peale was an artist and museum keeper. A prolific portrait painter, he was especially acclaimed for his likenesses of presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Peale's style was influenced by French Neoclassicism after a stay in Paris in his early thirties.

SIZE: 40.75 x 39.75 inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Somerset.
SOLD

SOLD....Portrait of George Edward Russell by George ...

Item Ref
8652

Oil on canvas in period giltwood frame, bearing the collection number '18' and names of sitter and artist.

A charming image of the young George Russell, standing by a column, a landscape behind him, and holding a battledore and shuttlecock.

GEORGE EDWARD RUSSELL (1786-1863) was a son of Claude Russell and worked in India for the East India Company. He was in India for 33 years and was, for a time, acting Governor of Madras.
He married Caroline, daughter of Major General George Bowness and the union produced a daughter, also Caroline, who married Captain James Maxstone of the East India Company army in 1851.

Maxstone was born in 1819 and succeeded to the title of 13th Laird of Cultoquhey in 1846. In 1859 he inherited the estate of Redgorton from his uncle Robert Graham thus becoming also the 6th Laird of Redgorton. He adopted the additional name and arms of Graham.

George Russell died at his home in Wiltshire in i853 aged 74.

GEORGE WATSON (1767-1837) was a Scottish portrait painter and first president of the Royal Scottish Academy.
Watson was born at his father's estate, Overmains, Berwickshire, in 1767, the son of John Watson and Frances Veitch of Elliott. He received his early education in Edinburgh, and got some instruction in painting from Alexander Nasmyth but when 18 years of age he went to London with an introduction to Sir Joshua Reynolds, who received him as a pupil. After two years spent in Sir Joshua's studio, he returned to Edinburgh, and established himself as a portrait-painter.

He exhibited frequently at the Royal Academy and the British Institution, and about 1815 was invited to London to paint a number of portraits, including those of the dean of Canterbury and Benjamin West. In 1820, in spite of much opposition from the Royal Institution, the Scottish Academy was founded, and Watson, who had been president of the previous society, was elected to the same office in the new one, the ultimate success of which was largely due to his tact and ability. He continued as president until his death, the academy receiving its royal charter a few months afterwards.

Shortly after his return from his first visit to London he married Rebecca, daughter of William Smellie, printer and naturalist, who, with five children, survived him.

Watson died in Edinburgh on 24 August 1837.
(He was a relative of Sir John Watson Gordon, portrait painter, who had added the Gordon to his name to distinguish himself from other painter members of the Watson family.)

SIZE: canvas 30 x 25 inches
Framed size: 35 .25 x 30.26 inches.
PROVENANCE: Berkshire Private Collection.
Verso: 1970's auction catalogue entry.
SOLD

Portrait, traditionally identified as Admiral Robert Blake ...

Item Ref
8814

Oil on canvas in 18th century gilt frame.

Originally an oval, this portrait has been mounted onto a rectangular canvas, possibly in the 18th century as that is the date of the frame. The inscriptions dates from the same period.
Roughly translated the Latin inscriptions mean " Died in 1657,in his 59th year" and "Blake the victor of the seas. First Cromwellian admiral of the ocean."

ROBERT BLAKE (1598-1657)was one of the most important military commanders of the Commonwealth of England and one of the most famous English admirals of the 17th century, whose successes have "never been excelled, not even by Nelson" according to one biographer. Blake is recognised as the chief founder of England's naval supremacy, a dominance subsequently inherited by the British Royal Navy into the early 20th century. Despite this, due to deliberate attempts to expunge the Parliamentarians from history following the Restoration, Blake's achievements tend not to receive the full recognition that they deserve.
In a letter written on 17 April 1797, to Admiral Sir John Jervis, Admiral Lord Nelson wrote "I do not reckon myself equal to Blake". He ranked Robert Blake as one of the greatest Naval Generals ever known, even when compared with his own reputation.
Blake died of old wounds on board his flagship within sight of Plymouth.
After lying in state in the Queen's House, Greenwich, he was given a full state funeral and was buried in Westminster Abbey in the presence of Oliver Cromwell and the members of the Council of State (although his internal organs had earlier been buried at St Andrew's Church, Plymouth).

ROBERT WALKER (1599–1658) was an English portrait painter, notable for his portraits of the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell and other distinguished Parliamentarians of the period. He was influenced by Van Dyck, and many of his paintings can now be found at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

SIZE:36 x 31 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:Private Collection.
VERSO: trade label of Frost and Reid of London and Bristol, restorers, with the handwritten number 4226 and the date 10.11.47.
Old storage label for Cox and Co. of Burnham on Sea.
SOLD

SOLD...Portrait of Hortense Mancini, Duchesse Mazarin, c.1670; ...

Item Ref
8482

HORTENSE MANCINI, Duchesse Mazarin (1646 – 1699)
Hortense Mancini, the Duchess Mazarin, was one of five Italian sisters all noted for their great beauty. Two of them became mistress to Louis XIV. Born in Rome in 1646, Hortense moved to France at an early age. Charles II proposed to her while there, but her uncle, Cardinal Mazarin, Chief Minister of France, did not think the exiled English king's prospects were good. In 1661 she was married at the age of fifteen to Armand-Charles de la Meilleraye but escaped her cruel and mentally unstable husband in 1668, seeking refuge in Rome with her sister Marie Mancini, Princess Colonna. Louis XIV declared himself her protector, but she left for England arriving at the Court of Charles II in 1675 and becoming his mistress shortly thereafter. After the death of Charles Hortense was well provided for by King James II, possibly because of her kinship with the new queen, Mary of Modena. She maintained a cultured 'salon' of all the learned men of London. Reputed to have had an affair with the famous poetess Aphra Behn as well as others of both sexes, Hortense was considered an adventuress. She was known for her compulsive gambling, her skill with the rapier, and her inclination to wear men's clothing, but especially for her beauty and wit.

JACOB FERDINAND VOET (1639 - c.1700) was a Flemish painter who made his career in Rome in the second half of the 17th century.
He was an expert portrait painter who combined solid Flemish professionalism with stylistic features from French and Italian Baroque portraiture.
Little is known of Voet's early life in Antwerp. He arrived in Rome in 1663, probably via France. Voet became a much sought-after portrait painter to the Papal court and the Roman aristocracy. Certain Englishmen who visited Rome on their Grand Tour, also commissioned Voet to paint their portraits. Voet specialized in half-length portraits, in which all attention is concentrated on the subject, who emerges from a neutral, dark background. He was a sophisticated master of his medium, painting with an effortless accuracy and a fluid ease. Voet's subjects tend to have a reflective expression. Usually they have very striking, memorable eyes, always large and evocative.

Oil on canvas
SIZE: canvas 28 x 23 inches
PROVENANCE: Italian Private Collection
SOLD

SOLD....Portrait of an Officer 1917, by Leon ...

Item Ref
8609

Oil on canvas in gilt frame. Signed and dated 'Leon Sprinck 1917', lower right.

A good and insightful portrait of a British army captain painted during World War One; in 1917 the war had a year to run.
The sitter wears the red hatband and tabs of an officer of the General Staff but, to judge by his decorations he had seen action, as amongst their number is the D.S.O.
(The Distinguished Service Order was awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, usually in actual combat. It is typically awarded to officers ranked Major (or its equivalent) or higher, but the honour has sometimes been awarded to especially valorous junior officers. 8,981 DSOs were awarded during the First World War, each award being announced in the London Gazette.)

The identity of the young officer is unknown as is whether he survived the Great War.

LEON SPRINCK was a fashionable artist of Russian stock, he painted many aristocrats and members of the gentry. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries he exhibited at the Royal Academy, London, the Royal Hibernian Academy and the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool. He lived at Portland Place in London.

SIZE: 39 x 34 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Collection of a retired army officer, Westmoreland country house.
Verso; old storage label " A & N.C.S.L. No.25. Mrs. Wickham April 1972".
SOLD

SOLD....Portrait of a Young Girl c.1700; Circle ...

Item Ref
8401

Oil on canvas in a 19th c. gilt frame of 17th c. 'cassetta' type.

A charming portrait of a pretty young girl by a member of the Circle of Robert Byng.

The sitter is holding a variegated tulip, which, in the Language of Flowers, symbolises 'beautiful eyes'; the large rose, of course, is the symbol of love.
The basket of flowers together also represent the beauty and fleeting quality of youth.

The girl wears a Classical robe, to her right a draped curtain and to her left the landscape of Arcadia...the mythical world so fashionable at the time.

This artist, strongly influenced by Byng's noted portraits of children, lacks the technical sophistication of his master, especially in the stylised treatment of the drapery.
However there is a strong sense of a painterly delight in using the medium - especially in some of the impasto in the drapery which contrasts pleasingly with the gently painted face.
The painting has a strong appeal and is an endearing image of an attractive young girl.

Robert Byng (1666 - 1720) was born in Wiltshire, but is buried in Oxford where he died in 1720, having lived there since before 1714.
He was a pupil of,and very strongly influenced by, Sir Godfrey Kneller (Principal Painter to the King and the most distinguished Baroque portraitist in England).
Byng's earliest dated portraits are c.1697; one of his younger brothers, Edward, was drapery painter to Kneller and his principal assistant.

SIZE: 44 x 33.5 inches inc. frame
PROVENANCE: a Private London Collection.

Verso: an old label of Francis Draper of Albany Street, London. 'Restorer and Preserver of Paintings in London and the Country'. By appointment to his Majesty the King; then follows a list of noted clients including the National Portrait Gallery and members of the Royal Family.

SOLD

SOLD.....Portrait of a Gentleman 1743 attributed to ...

Item Ref
8412

Oil on canvas in reproduction frame.

A portrait of a gentleman, the canvas inscribed 'M V Pinxt 1743' (M V painted this in 1743).

The subject has his right hand tucked into his coat; this was the accepted symbol of the sitter being a gentleman, who did not work for a living, rather than, for example, a prosperous merchant or lawyer.
His left arm rests upon a plinth...this also is symbolic, signifying the architecture of a large house and estate.
The man stands in a straight backed pose wearing a serious expression, this being considered the correct way for a gentleman of wealth and breeding to present himself to the world.

This is a 'textbook example' of mid 18th c. British portraiture.

Almost certainly this gentleman is the husband of the sitter in portrait 8410, 'Portrait of a Lady 1743; attributed to Moses Vanderbank'.

The portrait is very much in the style of JOHN VANDERBANK (1694-1739), especially the rubbed highlights and the treatment of the flesh tones - where a hot pink and cool grey-green are juxtaposed to suggest glowing skin.
These are Vanderbank's 'trademarks' and instantly recognisable.

However, John died four years before this painting was created.
I believe the answer is that the portrait is by his younger brother MOSES VANDERBANK (1695-after1745). He was a pupil of John's and has followed his brother's manner well. John nearly always signed and dated his portraits, it seems that Moses was influenced even by this.
No other works by Moses have survived, apart from three altarpieces in the 12th c. church at Adel, near Leeds.

Moses Vanderbank was even more improvident than his elder brother who was notorious for drunkenness and debt...it was said that only intemperance prevented John from being the best portraitist of his generation.
Moses did not have a talent as great as his brother's, but, as can be seen here, he could produce a portrait of charm and competence.

SIZE: 36 x 28 inches unframed

PROVENANCE: an East Anglian Collection for many years.




SOLD

Portrait of a Gentleman c.1670: Circle of ...

Item Ref
8858

Oil on canvas in a carved and giltwood period frame.

The sitter wears an Indian silk tea gown, highly fashionable, and so costly that Samuel Pepys had to hire one when his portrait was painted by Hayls.
The sitter is depicted within a beautifully painted feigned stone oval, bearing fruit. This motif was used so often by Beale as to be almost her trademark. It also was intended to be a Classical reminder.

MARY BEALE (1632-1697) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.
She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street.
The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

Beale was also a talented and intelligent writer, completing her ‘Discourse on Friendship’ [British Library] in 1667, in which she discusses friendship. Mary and her husband believed strongly in equality between man and wife, as shown by Mary’s ‘Essay on Friendship’. Without such equality, Mary believed, true friendship could not exist; ‘This being the perfection of friendship that it supposes its professors equall, laying aside all distance, & so leveling the ground, that neither hath therein the advantage of other.’

SIZE: canvas 30 x 25 inches.
34 x 29 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:Private Collection, London.
SOLD

Portrait of a Gentleman c.1680 by Mary ...

Item Ref
8815

Oil on canvas in 17th century frame.
This is a fine quality portrait painted with great sensitivity and insight. The sitter wears an expensive lace cravat and an Indian silk tea gown, highly fashionable, and so costly that Samuel Pepys had to hire one when his portrait was painted by Hayls.
The sitter is depicted within a beautifully painted feigned stone oval, bearing fruit. This motif was used so often by Beale as to be almost her trademark. It also was intended to be a Classical reminder.
Beale excelled in formats where an extra degree of sensitivity was required, and it is noticeable that many of her portraits, as in this example, a slight smile can be detected...there is a freshness and an immediacy that Beale's contemporaries were seldom able to achieve.

MARY BEALE (1632-1697) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.
She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street.
The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

Beale was also a talented and intelligent writer, completing her ‘Discourse on Friendship’ [British Library] in 1667, in which she discusses friendship. Mary and her husband believed strongly in equality between man and wife, as shown by Mary’s ‘Essay on Friendship’. Without such equality, Mary believed, true friendship could not exist; ‘This being the perfection of friendship that it supposes its professors equall, laying aside all distance, & so leveling the ground, that neither hath therein the advantage of other.’

SIZE: canvas 30 x 25 inches.
37 x 32 inches inc frame.
PROVENANCE: *Mr. Albert Hochster 1893.
* With Percy G. Beer, dealer in art with premises in Southsea and Ryde in the early 20th century.
*Private Collection.


SOLD