Portrait of Captain Mackinley c.1830, by Sir ...

Item Ref
9165

Oil on canvas in the original very fine frame.
This is an excellent portrait typical of the period; the handsome sitter has a fashionable brooding, Byronic look, with the dark background enhancing the drama and encouraging the viewer to concentrate on the sitter's face.

The sitter is thought to be Thomas George MacKinley (1809-1865); he was the son of John Mackinley and Maria Cates. Born in London, he was an officer in the Royal Navy, becoming a captain in July 1830.
The Mackinleys are related by marriage to the eminent Copeman and Boord families with connections to Wakehurst Place, Sussex.

SIR WILLIAM BEECHEY RA (12 December 1753 – 28 January 1839) was a leading English portraitist during the golden age of British painting. Beechey was admitted to the Royal Academy Schools in 1772, where he is thought to have studied under Johan Zoffany. He first exhibited at the Academy in 1776. His earliest surviving portraits are small-scale full-length and conversation pieces which are reminiscent of Zoffany. In 1782, he moved to Norwich, where he gained several commissions, including a portrait of Sir John Wodehouse and a series of civic portraits for St. Andrew's Hall, Norwich. By 1787, he had returned to London, and in 1789, he exhibited a celebrated portrait of John Douglas, Bishop of Carlisle (now in Lambeth Palace). Beechey’s career during this period is marked by a succession of adept and restrained portraits in the tradition of Sir Joshua Reynolds.
In 1793, he was commissioned to paint a full-length portrait of Queen Charlotte and subsequently named as her official portrait painter. That same year, he was elected as an associate member of the Royal Academy. Following his royal appointment, the number of royal commissions he undertook increased markedly, and in 1797 he exhibited six royal portraits. In 1798, he was elected a full member of the Royal Academy and painted George III and the Prince of Wales Reviewing Troops for that year’s academy’s exhibition. This enormous composition depicts King George III, the Prince of Wales and staff officers on horseback at an imagined cavalry review in Hyde Park. The king was reported to be delighted with the painting and rewarded Beechey with a knighthood.[ Joseph Farington's Diaries give many accounts of Beechey's relations with the royal family during this period, including his temporary fall from favour in 1804, which Farington attributes to the vagaries of George III’s mental condition.
Beechey's portraits of the turn of the century are considered to be his most lively. They are closer to the flamboyant and free techniques employed by his younger rivals, John Hoppner and Sir Thomas Lawrence.
Royal patronage resumed in around 1813, when Beechey was appointed portrait painter to Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester, and culminated with his appointment in 1830 as principal portrait painter to King William IV. In 1836, Beechey retired to Hampstead and on 9-11 June that year, the contents of his studio along with his collection were sold at Christie’s.
Although capable of impetuousness and irascibility, Beechey was known for his generosity to students. In particular, he took a close interest in the career of the young John Constable.
SIZE: 37.25 x 32 x 3.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: By descent to the estate of the Copeman family.
VERSO: faded old paper label and a copperplate inscription "Painted by Sir William Beechey".
£7,950

Dutch Ships in a Sea Battle c.1690, ...

Item Ref
9169

Oil on canvas in a beautiful painted tortoiseshell frame, bearing a brass nameplate. The canvas has been reduced in size at some time.
Of the Dutch Golden Age, this is a fine marine painting, full of action and extremely accurate in its depiction of the vessels involved. The unknown artist, a Follower of Storck, has captured his style very well. The details are almost of a miniaturist's skill.

ABRAHAM STORCK (or Sturckenburch) (bapt. 17 April 1644 in Amsterdam – buried 8 April 1708), was a Dutch painter, who enjoyed a reputation for his marine paintings, topographical views and Italianate harbour scenes. Storck was an outstanding draughtsman too.
His father was the painter Jan Jansz Sturck (or Johannes Storck) (1603-1673), from Wesel; his mother was Teuntje (Apolonia) Jacobs. The couple married in 1628. Storck had two brothers, who were also painters using the name Sturckenburch until c. 1688 after which they started calling themselves Storck or Sturck. It is likely they were all trained with their father in the family workshop and joined the local Guild of Saint Luke, otherwise it was impossible to sell any painting.
Around 1666 Storck set up his own workshop producing naval, harbuor scenes as well as landscape paintings and cityscapes. In 1670 he travelled with his brother Jacob and worked in Germany. In 1694, being 49 years old, he married the widow Neeltje Pieters van Meyservelt. At the end of his life he lived on Kattenburg near the harbour.
Storck's marine and river scenes were influenced by the two Willem van de Veldes (the elder and the younger), Ludolf Bakhuizen and by Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraaten.
He depicted ships' rigging and technical details with considerable accuracy, which likely shows the influence of the van de Veldes.

SIZE: 28 x 31.5 x 2.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Sotheby's, London, April 29, 2010. Sold for £9,000.
Deceased estate in Buckinghamshire.
£8,850

An English Ship and Other Vessels in ...

Item Ref
9161

Oil on canvas in a fine carved and giltwood 18th century frame.
A superb and accurate rendition, contemporary or nearly contemporary, of the original by Willem van de Velde the Younger, which is now in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich. It is described as being painted in the "mid 17th century to early 18th century", and continues "An English ship shown in a gale, together with other shipping. To the left is a small ship with men in the rigging shown furling the sail. In the right foreground a Dutch fishing craft known as a hoeker is bringing down her sail. In the left middle-distance is a ship with a number of figures on deck and several more in the rigging. In the right background is a ship at anchor. She has a pendant at the main and a flag at the fore. There are several other ships at anchor in the distance all riding out the storm. Although there is some blue sky immediately above the ship, the rest of the sky is filled with dark and heavy storm clouds."

WILLEM VAN DE VELDE the Younger (1683-1707) was a Dutch marine painter. son of Willem van de Velde the Elder, also a painter of sea-pieces, Willem van de Velde, the younger, was instructed by his father, and afterwards by Simon de Vlieger, a marine painter of repute at the time, and had achieved great celebrity by his art before he came to London. By 1673 he had moved to England, where he was engaged by Charles II, at a salary of £100, to aid his father in "taking and making draughts of sea-fights", his part of the work being to reproduce in colour the drawings of the elder Van de Velde. He was also patronized by the Duke of York and by various members of the nobility.
He died on 6 April 1707 in London, England, and was buried at St James's Church, Piccadilly. A memorial to him and his father lies within the church. Most of Van de Velde's finest works represent views off the coast of Holland, with Dutch shipping. His best productions are delicate, spirited and finished in handling, and correct in the drawing of the vessels and their rigging. The numerous figures are tellingly introduced, and the artist is successful in his renderings of sea, whether in calm or storm. The ships are portrayed with almost photographic accuracy, and are the most precise guides available to the appearance of 17th-century ships.
There are a number of van de Velde's marine paintings in the Wallace Collection, London, including "The Embarkation of King Charles II at Scheveningen, 1660".
SIZE: 32 x 41.25 x 2.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Collection of a Lady, Dulwich.
£6,950

Portrait of a Young Lady c.1835, Circle ...

Item Ref
9167

Oil on canvas in a period giltwood frame.
A charming portrait of an attractive young woman painted during the reign of King William IV.
The sitter wears a bright red rose in her hair, in the Language of Flowers this signifies romantic love. She holds to her breast a white rose; white roses mean purity and innocence. They can be used to show that you feel that your love is pure and that you believe the recipient to be pure. White roses also mean you are loyal.
It seems likely that this portrait was commissioned to commemorate a proposed marriage, at this time engagement rings were not always worn.

SIR MARTIN ARCHER SHEE (b Dublin, 20 Dec. 1769; d Brighton, 19 Aug. 1850). Irish portrait painter and writer on art, active from 1788 in London. There he became second only to Sir Tomas Lawrence as the leading society portraitist, painting members of the Royal Family and other aristocrats. His work was very much influenced by Lawrence, and he had a very active Studio and Circle. In 1830 he succeeded him as President of the Royal Academy, which he guided through a difficult period when it was under attack from Haydon and other disaffected artists. Examples of his work—which in style lies between the brilliance of Lawrence and the precision of West—are in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

SIZE: 34.5 x 29.25 x 3 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: A long standing private collection in Devon.
£1,995

Delft charger c.1760.

Item Ref

A well painted tin-glazed and attractive Delft charger, c.1760, probably Lambeth.
As is usual with delftware there are minor frittings to the rim; a hair-crack running around the bowl has been secured with handmade rivets. This was a skilled task and shows that at the time of the repair the charger was highly valued.
13.5 inches in diameter.
PROVENANCE: Yorkshire private collection for the last 45 years.
£135

Pencil/pen holders made from the woodwork of ...

Item Ref

These are two extremely evocative maritime items. NOTE: They may be purchased individually.
RMS MAURETANIA is a magical name for collectors of maritime memorabilia. Mauretania was an ocean liner designed by Leonard Peskett and built by Wigham Richardson and Swan Hunter for the Cunard Line, launched on the afternoon of 20 September 1906. She was the world's largest ship until the completion of RMS Olympic in 1911. Mauretania became a favourite among her passengers. She captured the Eastbound Blue Riband on her maiden return voyage in December 1907, then claimed the Westbound Blue Riband for the fastest transatlantic crossing during her 1909 season. She held both speed records for 20 years.
Mauretania was scrapped in 1935; she arrived at Rosyth in Scotland at about 6 am on 4 July 1935 during a half-gale, passing under Forth Bridge. By 6:30 am she passed the entrance to the Metal Industries yards under the command of Pilot Captain Whince. A lone kilted piper was present at the quayside, playing a funeral lament for the popular vessel. It was reported to author and historian John Maxtone-Graham that upon the final shut-down of her great engines, she gave a dark "final shudder...". Mauretania had her last public inspection on 8 July, a Sunday with 20,000 in attendance, with the monies raised going to local charities. Scrapping began shortly after and with great rapidity. Unusually, she was cut up afloat in drydock, with a complex system of wooden battens and pencil marks to monitor her balance. In a month her funnels were gone. By 1936 she was little more than a hulk, and she was beached at the tidal basin at Metal Industries and her remaining structure was scrapped by 1937.
The demise of the beloved Mauretania was protested by many of her loyal passengers, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who wrote a private letter against the scrapping.
SIZE: 3 inches tall.
PROVENANCE: in one family since purchased in 1935.

HMS GANGES was an 84-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 10 November 1821 at Bombay Dockyard, constructed from teak. She is notable for being the last sailing ship of the Navy to serve as a flagship, and was the second ship to bear the name.
Admiralty orders of 4 June 1816 directed her to be built as a facsimile of HMS Canopus (the ex-French ship Franklin, which had fought at the Battle of the Nile). Building began in May 1819, under the direction of master shipbuilder Jamsetjee Bomanjee Wadia.
She was commissioned at Portsmouth in 1823, and served in several locations over the following decades. Notable events included a period as flagship of the South America Station for three years, during which she landed Royal Marines in Rio de Janeiro after a mutiny by Brazilian soldiers. She also saw action in the Mediterranean from 1838 to 1840, bombarding Beirut and blockading Alexandria.
She was finally taken out of service in 1923, and transferred to the dockyard; in 1929, she was sold for breaking up. The following year, after over a century in service, she was finally broken up at Plymouth.
Upon breaking, some of the timber was used to make souvenirs, usually having a small plaque with some of the ship's history attached.
SIZE: 3.25 inches tall.
PROVENANCE: In one family since purchased in 1930.
Images of the vessels from Wikipedia.

£135

Portrait of a Young Boy of the ...

Item Ref
9162

Oil on canvas in a fine carved and giltwood period frame.
This is a charming portrait of a boy indulging in the sport of archery, considered an appropriate pastime for a young aristocrat.
Over the years the name of the sitter and the artist had been forgotten; the portrait was described as 'English School, a boy as Cupid'. Once a picture hanging support was removed from the back an old handwritten label saying TOWNSHEND HEIRLOOMS was visible. There were two great sales of pictures from Raynham Hall, Norfolk, seat of the Marquess and Marchioness Townshend, the second was conducted by Sotheby's on the 14th June, 1911. Library Ireland, in 1913, mentions Charles Jervas, in a list of his 'principal paintings', as having created 'Boy with Bow and Arrows, standing in a Landscape', and it being sold in the Townshend Heirlooms sale of 1911.
There is little doubt that this is that painting by Jervas. The sitter is most probably a member of the Townshend family. Charles Townshend is the most likely. He became 3rd Viscount Townshend of Raynham and was born on 11 July 1700. He was the son of Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend of Raynham and Hon. Elizabeth Pelham. He married Audrey Ethelreda Harrison, daughter of Edward Harrison and Frances Bray, on 29 May 1723. He died on 12 March 1764.

CHARLES JERVAS (also Jarvis; c. 1675 – 2 November 1739) was an Irish portrait painter, translator, and art collector of the early 18th century. Born in County Offaly, Ireland around 1675, Jervas studied in London, England as an assistant under Sir Godfrey Kneller between 1694 and 1695.
Painting portraits of the city's intellectuals, among them such personal friends as Jonathan Swift and the poet Alexander Pope (both now in the National Portrait Gallery, London), Charles Jervas became a popular artist often referred to in the works of literary figures of the period.
With his growing reputation, Jervas succeeded Sir Godfrey Kneller as Principal Portrait Painter to King George I in 1723, and continued to live in London until his death in 1739.
SIZE: 35.5 x 32.25 x 2.75 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE. Raynham Hall, Norfolk. Sold at Sotheby's 1911. Private collection, Derbyshire, for many years.
£12,500