Charles Bertie II of Uffington 1711, by ...

Item Number
9044

Oil on canvas is a fine period carved and giltwood frame. Painted in 1711 when he became a Member of Parliament.
Dimly seen by his left shoulder is a stag. It has no relation to any of the family coats of arms, but clearly was of great significance to Charles.
In fact as art collector Richard Grigson has informed me :' the website of the Bull & Swan in Burghley says "there was a drinking club at Burghley House founded by the Fifth Earl of Exeter in 1684, called the Honourable Order of Little Bedlam. The Earl of Gainsborough was known as Greyhound, the Honourable Charles Bertie was The Stag, the Earl of Denbigh was Tyger amongst other nefarious characters..." ' This club was relaunched in 1705.

CHARLES BERTIE 1674 -1730. Married in 1704 to the daughter and heiress of John Norborne Esq. of Great Stukeley, Huntindonshire. (3 sons, 1 daughter).
Guided by his very politically minded father, Charles Bertie I, the sitter became active in politics from at least 1702; however it was not until 1711 that he gained a parliamentary seat, when returned on a family interest for Stamford at a by-election caused by the death of his father.
In 1713 he followed the lead of his kinsman, the 2nd Earl of Abingdon, Montagu Venables-Bertie in voting against the French Commerce Bill. He evidently did not sever all links with his party, for the Worsley list classed him as a Tory, and after 1715 he remained in Opposition, voting against the Septennial Bill.
He died on 12 April 1730 leaving a substantial inheritance; he was succeeded by his son Charles Bertie III, who did not choose a poitical career.

SIZE: 37 x 32.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: By direct family descent until purchased a few years ago by a member of another distinguished and ancient family.
VERSO: Old handwritten label date August 1885 giving details of the sitter and its place of hanging in the Drawing Room, numbered 2, so presumably hung next to the portrait of his son numbered 1 in the same hand. Now obscured by the recent relining the canvas bears D'Agar's signature and the date.
£5,950

PORTRAIT OF ELIZABETH, DUCHESS OF MARLBOROUGH C.1730: ...

Item Number
8824A

Oil on canvas in a good 18th century William Kent frame.
The Duchess sits beside an orange tree and holds one of its flowers.
Oranges were an expensive luxury in Northern Europe, coming as they did from the warm South. They also has considerable symbolic significance.
The orange tree bears leaves, flowers and fruit all at the same time. The leaves, which are evergreen, are the symbol of eternal love, the white flowers represent purity and generosity of spirit and the fruit represents hope for the future of a family or dynasty.
In the upper left of the portrait is depicted the coat of arms for the Spencer-Churchill family.
The Hon. ELIZABETH TREVOR, DUCHESS OF MARLBOROUGH, was the daughter of the Thomas Trevor, second Baron Trevor of Bromham and wife of Charles Spencer, fifth Earl of Sunderland and third Duke of Marlborough.
Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough KG, PC (1706 – 1758), known as The Earl of Sunderland between 1729 and 1733.
He was a British soldier and politician. He briefly served as Lord Privy Seal in 1755. He led British forces during the Raid on St Malo in 1758.
He was the second son of Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland and Lady Anne Churchill, the second daughter of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough and his wife Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough.
Charles inherited the Sunderland title from his older brother in 1729, becoming 5th Earl of Sunderland, and then the Marlborough title from his aunt, Henrietta, 2nd Duchess of Marlborough in 1733.
He was one of the original governors of London's Foundling Hospital, the foundation of which in 1739 marked a watershed in British child care advocacy and attitudes.
The Duke and Duchess had five children:
Lady Diana Spencer (1734–1808). Married first Frederick St John, 2nd Viscount Bolingbroke and secondly Topham Beauclerk.
Elizabeth Herbert, Countess of Pembroke and Montgomery (January/March 1737 – 30 April 1831). Married Henry Herbert, 10th Earl of Pembroke.
George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough (26 January 1739 – 29 January 1817).
Lord Charles Spencer (31 March 1740 – 16 June 1820).
Lord Robert Spencer (3 May 1747 – 23 June 1831)
MARIA VERELST (1680-1744)was arguably the greatest female immigrant artist of the late Stuart/early Georgian era, she was the daughter of Dutch painter Herman Verelst (1641-1690) and niece of the more well-known Stuart court painter Simon Verelst (1644-1710). Maria moved to England at the age of three with her father following the siege of Vienna by the Ottoman Empire and, following her father’s success, later became his student. Well-connected and highly skilled, Maria established herself quickly and her earliest recorded painting dates to c. 1695, painted when Maria was fourteen, and depicts William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford (1626-1695) [Welbeck Abbey]. Maria painted several works for Welbeck as well as thirteen portraits for James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos.
In addition to being a talented painter, Maria was also well educated and spoke a number of different languages which no doubt helped her secure patronage.
SIZE: 60 x 50.75 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Cheshire Family Private Collection for many years.
With Roy Precious Fine Art.
Collection of a Fellow of a Cambridge College.
SOLD

Double portrait of two boys c.1740; Follower ...

Item Number
8518A

Oil on canvas in period carved and giltwood frame.

This charming double portrait is full of symbolism easily understood by the 18th century viewer; it depicts two brothers in the mythological land of Arcady or Arcadia. For some time it had been very fashionable, for adults as well as children, to be depicted as shepherds.
The lambs are a traditional symbol of innocence and virtue, in which guise they fit perfectly into Arcadia, the land from which all guilt and sin have been banished.
The dog represents loyalty and obedience, character traits considered desirable in the young.
The bird represents the transience of life, and especially youth, as it can easily fly away.
As guardian of the flock, the older brother holds the shepherd's crook and his arms are protectively around the younger boy.

The artist is an unknown provincial; although he has been influenced by the fashionable portrait painter Charles Jervas his style has a direct, rather naive quality which has great appeal. Double portraits of children are most uncommon and this one pleases in several ways .. not least in the amusing depiction of the fluffy lambs!

CHARLES JERVAS (c. 1675 - 1739) was an Irish portrait painter, translator, and art collector.
Born in County Offaly, Ireland around 1675, Jervas studied in London, England as an assistant under Sir Godfrey Kneller between 1694 and 1695.
Painting portraits of the city's intellectuals, among them such personal friends as Jonathan Swift and the poet Alexander Pope (both now in the National Portrait Gallery, London), Charles Jervas became a popular artist often referred to in the works of literary figures of the period.

Jervas gave painting lessons to Pope at his house in Cleveland Court, St James's, which Pope mentions in his poem, 'To Belinda on the Rape of the Lock', written 1713, published 1717 in 'Poems on Several Occasions'.
With his growing reputation, Jervas succeeded Kneller as Principal Portrait Painter to King George I in 1723, and continued to live in London until his death in 1739.

SIZE:50.5 x 41.75 inches inc. frame
PROVENANCE: For many years the property of a noted collector in Bath, Somerset.
With Roy Precious Fine Art.
Collection of a Fellow of a Cambridge College.
SOLD

PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG BOY AND HIS ...

Item Number
8524A

A fine quality oil on canvas in original carved and giltwood frame.
This charming portrait depicts a young aristocrat wearing the fashionable 'banyan' or loose robe favoured for relaxation at that time. Equally fashionable was the ostrich feather trimmed tricorne hat and the cravat tied 'a la Steinkirk'.
(During the wars of Louis XIV of 1689–1697 the flowing cravat was replaced with the military "Steinkirk", named after the Battle of Steenkerque in 1692. The Steinkirk was a long, narrow, plain or lightly trimmed neckcloth wrapped once about the neck in a loose knot, with the lace of fringed ends twisted together and tucked out of the way into a button hole. The Steinkirk was popular with men and women until the 1720s.)
The boy stands on a stately terrace with an Italianate garden behind him; the beautifully painted Spaniel playfully crouching at his feet was probably a pet but is also a symbol of fidelity and trust.
CHARLES D'AGAR (1669 - 1723) came to England with his Huguenot father Jacques in 1681, settling here permanently after a stay in Copenhagen by 1691. He had a good practice, numbering such people as the Duke of Buccleuch and Lord Bolingbroke among his patrons.
D'Agar painted very much in the style of Michael Dahl, whose portraits of children are very similar, especially in the treatment of the hair.
This portrait is strongly reminiscent of a portrait of Lord George Douglas in the collection of the Dukes of Buccleuch, which was painted in 1709. Payment of £16 2s 6d was paid for this.

SIZE: 58 x 49 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: a country house collection in the South West of England.
With Roy Precious Fine Art.
Collection of a Fellow of a Cambridge College.
SOLD