Small 17th century carved giltwood mirror.

Item Ref
9134

A fine small 17th century open carved giltwood frame, containing a rectangular mirror. The frame's inner moulding is surrounded by a bold undulating ribbon entwined in scrolling acanthus leaves, which lead up from a voluted base to a crested pediment; probably Italian.

SIZE: 16 x 14 inches.
PROVENANCE: The Rintoul Collection.
£1,650
| $2,197 USD | €1,870 EUR

Portrait of Mrs. Grenaway 1730, by John ...

Item Ref
9121

Oil on canvas in a frame made by the famous Norwich carvers, gilders, looking glass manufacturers, and framemakers W. Boswell and Son. (Trade label verso).
Signed and dated 1730, lower left, partially obscured by the later inscription 'Mr. Grenaway'.

This is a particularly fine, sensitive and insightful portrait and ranks among Heins very best work.
The sitter has long been thought to be the wife of William Grenaway, attorney in Norwich; but we feel it is more likely to be his mother.
William's portrait, also on this website, is the same size and framed to match, but this lady looks considerably older than him, she wears widow's weeds [1], and is depicted looking in the same direction as him. When hanging together, one of these portraits would have its back to the other. As a general rule, husband and wife portraits depict them inclining towards each other, not away.

[1]The “weeds” in the term comes from the Old English waed, which means “garment.” Widow's weeds have several defining characteristics, including dark or muted colours and simple designs.
The wearing of widow's weeds would have instantly distinguished a widow from those around her, making her state very obvious. It was also a class symbol, as only the very wealthy could afford the mourning ritual of full mourning to half mourning etc, which involved an entirely new wardrobe and a general withdrawal from society.

JOHN THEODORE HEINS (1697-1756), also known as Dietrich or Dirk, was born in Germany. He settled in Norwich (at that time a city second in importance only to London) in 1720.
He made a good living painting the local prosperous merchants and gentry and was accepted into their social circle. His style was influenced by that of Thomas Hudson.
Many of his finer works were commissioned by the Astley family of Melton Constable.
Heins died in Norwich and his will was proved 30 August 1756 by his widow, Abigail.
His son, also called John Theodore Heins was also a portraitist but lacked his father's talent.
Heins senior's work is in Norwich Castle Museum, Felbrigg Hall (National Trust), the National Portrait Gallery, Cambridge University and others.
SIZE: 34.5 x 29.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Old collection, a Norfolk country house.
£4,650
| $6,192 USD | €5,269 EUR

Portrait of William Grenaway 1730, by John ...

Item Ref
9120

Oil on canvas in a frame made by the famous Norwich carvers, gilders, looking glass manufacturers, and framemakers W. Boswell and Son. (Trade label verso).
Signed and dated 1730, lower left. Later inscription 'Mr. Grenaway'.

This excellent portrait is typical of the best work of Heins. The sitter is William Grenaway, (Greenaway) 1681-1756. He was an attorney and a member of the wealthy mercantile and professional classes of Norwich and surrounding area; Heins was their chosen artist, he made a good living and had been accepted into their social circle. His style was influenced by that of Thomas Hudson, and is a frank and honest representation of the sitter, their character astutely observed and depicted. This portrait of William, aged 49, conforms precisely with the above.
The National Portrait Gallery has, in its collection, a mezzotint of this portrait, engraved by Heins. (NPG D2499).
JOHN THEODORE HEINS (1697-1756), also known as Dietrich or Dirk, was born in Germany. He settled in Norwich (at that time a city second in importance only to London) in 1720.
He made a good living painting the local prosperous merchants and gentry and was accepted into their social circle. His style was influenced by that of Thomas Hudson.
Many of his finer works were commissioned by the Astley family of Melton Constable.
Heins died in Norich and his will was proved 30 August 1756 by his widow, Abigail.
His son, also called John Theodore Heins was also a portraitist but lacked his father's talent.
Heins senior's work is in Norwich Castle Museum, Felbrigg Hall (National Trust), the National Portrait Gallery, Cambridge University and others.
SIZE: 34.5 x 29.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Old collection, a Norfolk country house.
£4,450
| $5,925 USD | €5,042 EUR

Portrait of a Lady c.1700/10; Circle of ...

Item Ref
9126

Oil on canvas in a good 18th century giltwood frame.
This is an excellent example of the typical society portrait of the period; the lady regards the viewer with a quiet confidence, her hair in the fashionable style as is her daring 'undress'. The robe open to show her chemise ... this relaxed style of dressing for one's portrait was encouraged by artists, as it was a lot easier and quicker to paint than elaborate formal daywear.

SIR GODFREY KNELLER (1646-1723) was the most distinguished painter of baroque portraits in England.
Born in Lubeck, he trained with Bol and Rembrandt, coming to London in 1676.
By 1679 he had painted the King and remained the most famous and successful portrait painter in England until his death.
In 1688 he was made Principal Painter to the King and was knighted in 1692 and a made a baronet in 1715.
His work was greatly in demand and so he maintained a large and busy studio, with many assistants who painted in his style. A number of these men went on to become established portraitists in their own right.

SIZE: 36 x 31.25 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: London Private Collection. VERSO: a handwritten label "Mr. S.A. Smith. 1935".
£3,985
| $5,306 USD | €4,515 EUR

Portrait of Elizabeth Wentworth (?), c.1620; Circle ...

Item Ref
9125

Oil on canvas in an appropriate frame.

This is a fine quality painting; there is a sense of the character of the sitter and her costly clothes are rendered with exquisite detail. This was a matter of great importance at this time. People were judged very much by their outward display and the money that was spent on jewellery and clothing by those who could afford it was colossal.
The sitter wears ropes of huge pearls...the pearl was a symbol of purity...and a large diamond brooch.
Research indicates that the lady is possibly Elizabeth Wentworth, daughter of John Wentworth and Elizabeth Southwell. She married Charles Garneys, of an ancient and wealthy family, in 1598. Charles was High Sheriff of Norfolk from 1652. They had a child, also Charles (1608-1661).
The Garneys lived at Somerleyton Hall, Suffolk; Kenton Hall, Suffolk and Boyland Hall, Morningthorpe, Norfolk.
Wentworth Garneys (1656-1679) was the grandson of Elizabeth and the fact that her marriage into the Garneys had brought them Somerleyton Hall is commemorated in his name.
The Garneys main seat was Boyland Hall and this portrait was hanging there in 1927 by which time the estate had passed to the Irbys. The painting is described in detail in Sing's book on portraits in Norfolk country houses.

MARCUS GHEERAERTS (also written as Gerards or Geerards; c. 1561/62 – 19 January 1636) was a Flemish artist working at the Tudor court, described as "the most important artist of quality to work in England in large-scale between Eworth and Van Dyck". He was brought to England as a child by his father Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder, also a painter. He became a fashionable portraitist in the last decade of the reign of Elizabeth I under the patronage of her champion and pageant-master Sir Henry Lee. He introduced a new aesthetic in English court painting that captured the essence of a sitter through close observation. He became a favourite portraitist of James I's queen, Anne of Denmark, but fell out of fashion with the royal family in the late 1610s. His work thereafter was among the lesser aristocracy and rich gentry.
SIZE: 34.5 x 28.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: *Colonel Frederick Artur Irby, Boyland Hall, Morningthorpe, Suffolk by 1907.
*And by descent to Mrs. Victor Ramsay Fairfax of Brook House, Great Waldingfield, Sudbury, Suffolk.
*Her sale, Christie's, London, 18 April 1957, as by Zuccaro. VERSO : Christie's stencil and the date of the auction in chalk.
LITERATURE: H.H. Prince Frederick Duleep Sing, "Portraits in Norfolk Houses", Norwich, 1927, p.28, no.32 (as at Boyland Hall).
£11,850
| $15,779 USD | €13,427 EUR

Portrait of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of ...

Item Ref
9122

An oil on oak panel within an appropriate 'cassetta' frame.
Depicted as a young man, this fine portrait of this historically important aristocrat is 16th century in style, but is probably 17th century, based on a three quarter length portrait formerly in the collection of the Earl of Carlisle (now in the NPG) by an unknown Anglo-Dutch artist; previously attributed to Steven van der Meulen.
Faintly inscribed above the sitter is 'Thomas Howard Duke of Norfolke -", and below that, very faintly "AETAT …" (at his age of …).
To his right the Norfolk coat of arms.

The painting is Anglo-Netherlandish in style and is a sophisticated work. The painting method is straightforward but with some fine brushwork and modelling, especially in the face. The paint layers are thinly applied and subtle pigment mixtures and brushwork are used.

THOMAS HOWARD, 4th Duke of Norfolk, (born March 10, 1538, Kenninghall, Norfolk, England—died June 2, 1572, London), English nobleman executed for his intrigues against Queen Elizabeth I on behalf of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, a Roman Catholic claimant to the English throne.

He was the son of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, who was put to death for alleged treasonable activities in 1547. Restored to his father’s title on the accession of Queen Mary Tudor in 1553, he succeeded his grandfather as Duke of Norfolk in 1554. Norfolk was in favour with both Queen Mary and her successor, Elizabeth I. He commanded the English forces that invaded Scotland in 1559–60, and he presided over the commission that inquired in 1568 into the quarrel between Mary Stuart and Scotland’s Protestant nobility.

Mary had just fled to England, where she became Elizabeth’s prisoner. Norfolk listened readily to suggestions from the Scottish statesman William Maitland and others that the difficulties between England and Scotland could be resolved if Norfolk would wed Mary and have her declared Elizabeth’s successor. Norfolk, however, was neither bold enough to ask Elizabeth’s consent for the match nor disloyal enough to raise an insurrection against her. Instead, several Roman Catholic nobles in northern England revolted in an attempt to free the Queen of Scots, marry her to Norfolk, and restore Roman Catholicism to England. The uprising was suppressed, and in October 1569 Elizabeth had Norfolk arrested. He was released the following August, but he soon allowed himself to be drawn into the plot of Roberto Ridolfi, an Italian merchant living in London, for the murder of Queen Elizabeth followed by a Spanish invasion of England and installation of Mary on the English throne. Discovery of the plot led to Norfolk’s imprisonment and execution. (Encylopaedia Britannica)

SIZE: 19.75 x 14.45 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Old Shropshire Private Collection. VERSO: Several old labels, including the coat of arms and name of a previous owner and a collection number.
SOLD