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Portrait of a Gentleman c.1650; Circle of Cornelius Johnson.
: Oil in canvas in good 17th c. style Dutch ripple-edged frame.
Centre right the later applied signature and date 'C.J. 1653'
An excellent portrait typical of Johnson and his Circle; expensively dressed but without pretension, the sitter looks not at us, but to one side as if lost in thought.
He is depicted within the feigned oval often used by Johnson and his admirers.
Hir silk clothing and fine lace are indications of his wealth and status and are carefully depicted.
In a period when black clothing was the fashion artists strove to depict the different nuances and textures of the fabrics as convincingly as possible.
They found that black is an ideal background with which to contrast the crisp white linen and rich lace and this dramatically accentuates the face and hand gestures. This extreme opposition between black and white is both austere and exciting, and is a characteristic feature of portraiture of this period.
CORNELIUS JOHNSON (Jonson, Jansen, Van Ceulen) 1593-1661 was born in London, the son of Flemish emigres.
Although Waterhouse thought he was trained in Holland it seems more likely (as Collins Baker has it) that Marcus Gheeraerts was his master in London.
Johnson is the most satisfying and 'English' of the portraitists working in England in the 1620s and 30s. He has a fine technique with a restrained and introspective style, with careful attention to the costume details.
His accurate portraits are never flattering but a sober and objective portrayal of his usual sitters: the gentry and lesser nobility. His style, and that of his Circle of course, is easily identified by its coolness and restraint.
In 1632 he was made Painter to the King, but his wife's fears of the approaching Civil War caused him to retire to Holland in 1643. He continued to paint for the rest of his life, but was reportedly ruined by the extravagance of his second wife and died a poor man in Utrecht in 1661.
SIZE: 28 x 21 75 inches canvas size
36 x 29.5 inches inc. frame
PROVENANCE:*English Private Collection.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
*Collection of an internationally known European theatrical costume designer.
Ref: 8828
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Gentleman c.1660; Circle of Bartholomeus van der Helst.
Oil on canvas.
This is a portrait of the Dutch Golden Age, the age of Rembrandt and Hals. The careful and precise painting of fabric and lace was typical of the period and van der Helst was noted as a master.
The gentleman, fashionably and expensively dressed, stands in a relaxed yet elegant pose; his expression serious and contemplative as he looks thoughtfully at the viewer.
In the distant background is a huge building...castle, or palace, it is not possible to tell. Clearly it was of significance to the sitter.

Bartholomeus van der Helst (1613 – 1670) was a Dutch portrait painter.
Born in Harlaam he moved to Amsterdam about 1639 where van der Helst was a contemporary of Rembrandt. He soon became the most popular painter of portraits in that city, his flattering portrayals being more immediately appealing than Rembrandt's dark and introspective later work. Some of Rembrandt's pupils, including Ferdinand Bol and Govaert Flinck, adopted Van Helst's style instead of their master's.
Van der Helst remained the most influential portrait painter of the Amsterdam elite until his death in 1670.

SIZE: canvas: 44.5 x 36.5 inches.
frame: 51 x 43 inches.
Ref: 8800
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Gentleman c.1670: Circle of Mary Beale
Oil on canvas in a carved and giltwood period frame.

The sitter wears an Indian silk tea gown, highly fashionable, and so costly that Samuel Pepys had to hire one when his portrait was painted by Hayls.
The sitter is depicted within a beautifully painted feigned stone oval, bearing fruit. This motif was used so often by Beale as to be almost her trademark. It also was intended to be a Classical reminder.

MARY BEALE (1632-1697) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.
She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street.
The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

Beale was also a talented and intelligent writer, completing her ‘Discourse on Friendship’ [British Library] in 1667, in which she discusses friendship. Mary and her husband believed strongly in equality between man and wife, as shown by Mary’s ‘Essay on Friendship’. Without such equality, Mary believed, true friendship could not exist; ‘This being the perfection of friendship that it supposes its professors equall, laying aside all distance, & so leveling the ground, that neither hath therein the advantage of other.’

SIZE: canvas 30 x 25 inches.
34 x 29 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:Private Collection, London.
Ref: 8858
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Gentleman c.1670; attributed to Jacob Huysmans.
Oil on canvas in black and gilt period frame.

The sitter is probably a Johnstone of Pentefract, a Cudworth, or a Hake of Chatteris and Pilsgate.
The portrait is faintly inscribed, upper right, "Ae 23" (in the 23rd year of his age).

This portrait came from Denston Hall in Suffolk (see image 7) the estate which for centuries belonged to the Robinson family.
Having descended through various branches of the family the different estates became invested in Algernon Dunn Gardner in the early 20th century. Connected to the Robinson family by marriage, Dunn Gardner kept this portrait on the walls of Denston until it was removed by his daughter when the property was sold 30 years ago. It was then kept in storage until now.

JACOB HUYSMANS (c.1633–1696) was a Flemish portrait painter. He moved to England during the reign of Charles II where he became one of the fashionable painters of the court. His chief portraits are those of Izaak Walton and Catherine of Braganza, Charles II's wife (both displayed in the National Portrait Gallery, London)
He was born into a family of artists in Antwerp. He was the uncle of Jan-Baptiste and Cornelis Huysmans. He learned to paint from Gilles Backereel and Frans Wouters and moved to England, where he later influenced David des Granges (1611–1675). His first works were pastiches of work from Anthony van Dyck. As a Roman Catholic he was favoured by Catharine of Braganza. When Samuel Pepys visited his workshop in Westminster on 26 August 1664, he described him as a 'picture-drawer ... which is said to exceed Lilly (Lely). Huysmans's most important portrait of Catharine of Braganza, Queen Catharine as a Shepherdess (c. 1664; Brit. Royal Col.), was one of the pictures Pepys saw on that occasion. Painting his female subjects as sheperdesses with clothing embellished with embroidery and jewellery were typical of his style.

Huysmans died in Jermyn Street, London, in 1696, and was buried in St. James's Church in Piccadilly.

SIZE: 37.25 x 32 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: By descent to The Manor House, Chatteris and thence to the Dunn Gardner Collection, Denston Hall in 1908 then by descent.
Old handwritten labels verso.
Ref: 8795
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Gentleman c.1680 by Mary Beale
Oil on canvas in 17th century frame.
This is a fine quality portrait painted with great sensitivity and insight. The sitter wears an expensive lace cravat and an Indian silk tea gown, highly fashionable, and so costly that Samuel Pepys had to hire one when his portrait was painted by Hayls.
The sitter is depicted within a beautifully painted feigned stone oval, bearing fruit. This motif was used so often by Beale as to be almost her trademark. It also was intended to be a Classical reminder.
Beale excelled in formats where an extra degree of sensitivity was required, and it is noticeable that many of her portraits, as in this example, a slight smile can be detected...there is a freshness and an immediacy that Beale's contemporaries were seldom able to achieve.

MARY BEALE (1632-1697) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.
She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street.
The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

Beale was also a talented and intelligent writer, completing her ‘Discourse on Friendship’ [British Library] in 1667, in which she discusses friendship. Mary and her husband believed strongly in equality between man and wife, as shown by Mary’s ‘Essay on Friendship’. Without such equality, Mary believed, true friendship could not exist; ‘This being the perfection of friendship that it supposes its professors equall, laying aside all distance, & so leveling the ground, that neither hath therein the advantage of other.’

SIZE: canvas 30 x 25 inches.
37 x 32 inches inc frame.
PROVENANCE: *Mr. Albert Hochster 1893.
* With Percy G. Beer, dealer in art with premises in Southsea and Ryde in the early 20th century.
*Private Collection.


Ref: 8815
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Gentleman c.1685; Attributed to John Kerseboom
Oil on canvas in 'cassetta' frame.

The fashionable and expensively dressed sitter looks confidently out of the frame as if surveying his extensive lands.
His high wig (from which fashion came the expression 'big-wig' for someone important), his silks, his sword and particularly his stance, all make this the archetypal Baroque swagger portrait.

The pose and treatment of the material are typical of Kerseboom.

JOHN (JOHANN) KERSEBOOM (working 1680s - 1708) Born in Solingen, the Rhineland; came to England in the 1680s he quickly acquired a large portrait clientele. His patterns derive from Lely and Kneller, but his heads have recognisable individuality. He charged £16 10s for a framed 50 x 40 in 1694.


SIZE:48 x 39 inches canvas size.
57 x 47 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE: Private collection in an East Anglian Elizabethan country house.
Ref: nlfk3
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Portrait of a Gentleman c.1695; Circle of Nicolas de Largilliere.
Oil on canvas in reproduction frame.
A beautiful and sensitive portrait, expertly painted, of a handsome young man. The pose suggests movement...the head turned as if to speak to a companion, whilst the hand points elegantly to the side.
The hand, notoriously difficult for lesser artists, is superbly depicted.

NICOLAS DE LARGILLIERE (1656 – 1746).
Largillière's father, a merchant, took him to Antwerp at the age of three. As a boy, he spent nearly two years in London. Sometime after his return to Antwerp, a failed attempt at business led him to the studio of Goubeau. However, Largillière left at the age of eighteen and went to England, where he was befriended and employed by Sir Peter Lely for four years at Windsor, Berkshire.

His painting caught the attention of Charles II, who wished to retain Largillière in his service, but the controversy aroused by the Rye House Plot against Roman Catholics alarmed Largillière, who left for Paris, where he was well received by the public as a painter.

Upon ascending to the throne in 1685, James II requested Largillière to return to England. James II offered Largillière the office of Keeper of the Royal Collections, but he declined due to his continuing unease about Rye House Plot. However, during a short stay in London, he painted portraits of the King, the Queen Mary of Modena, and the Prince of Wales James Francis Edward Stuart.
In Paris, during the year 1686, Largillière produced a portrait of the painter Charles Le Brun for admittance to the French Academy. The portrait shows Le Brun, then the chairman of the academy, at work on an entombment, surrounded by classical busts and figurines scattered upon the floor and table within the picture. Le Brun, impressed by Largillière's portrait, accepted him to the Academy. In 1690, Largillière was documented by the French Academy.
Largillière was appointed as Chancellor of the French Academy in 1743. He died on the 20th March, 1746.

SIZE: canvas 29 x 24 inches.
Framed size: 34.75 x 29.5 inches.

PROVENANCE:
*Mary Gabrielle Paston-Bedingfield, Mrs. Ferdinand John Eyre, Moreton Hall, Bury St. Edmunds. (see Image 9).
*On the death of Mr. Eyre, sold at Christie's, London, 1928 as W.Wissing, portrait of Duke of Monmouth. Bt. Lewis.
*Knight, Frank and Rutley, London 1929 as Van der Werff, Portrait of the Artist. (old label verso).
*Private Collection, New York by the beginning of this century.
*Private Collection, London.
Ref: 8864
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Portrait of a Gentleman c.1705, by Michael Dahl.
Oil on canvas in a period carved and giltwwod frame.

A good quality portrait absolutely typical of its time; the handsome young sitter wears a fashionably large and expensive wig. (The expression 'bigwig' for a rich or important person comes from this fashion).
Not only typical of its time but also of Dahl's style; the turned head, with more than a hint of swagger, and the negligently draped silk wrap with casual tying of the cravat...all very much 'a la mode' for the young aristocrat or gentry.

MICHAEL DAHL (1659-1743) was born in Stockholm; after studying in Paris, Rome and Frankfurt he settled in London in 1689. He soon became the best patronised portrait painter in England after Kneller. He was much employed at the Court painting many portraits; a great patron of the 1690s was the Duke of Somerset, for whom he painted the series of portraits of Court ladies known as the 'Petworth Beauties'.

His style is extremely close to Kneller but his interpretation of character is less brash and more human. He has a quieter but somehow more understanding appeal to character which relies on its own integrity to make its impact; his works are of a real distinction.
This painting is typical of Dahl's sensitive portraiture and is of considerable charm.

PROVENANCE: H.A. Bright of Brockbury Hall, Colwall, Herefordshire, and by descent to:
A.H. Bright, by whom lent to:
F.Tustin, Colwall, by 1938.

Brights have occupied Brockbury since the time of Henry Bright (1562-1626), prebendary of Worcester and master of King's School. The existing brick house was built by Robert Bright (1664-1749) but has an earlier core. It was refronted in 1738, probably by Robert Bright's grandson, also Robert, a West Indies merchant.

SIZE: 35 x 29.5 inches inc. frame.
Ref: 8926/35
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Gentleman c.1745; Attributed to Petrus Johannes van Reyschoot.
Oil on canvas in a fine 18th century carved and giltwood frame.

A fine quality portrait of a fashionably dressed young man in the reign of George II.
He wears a bag wig, the black silk visible at the back of his head, and his waistcoat is foppishly part unbuttoned with his lace cravat looped through the upper part; to complete the image of the 'gentilhomme a la mode' his tricorne hat is tucked beneath his left arm.

PETRUS JOHANNES VAN REYSCHOOT (1702-1772) was a Flemish painter; he was born in Ghent of an artist family in 1702 and died there in 1772. He was known as 'the Englishman' to distinguish him from a brother.
He was possibly the Reyschoot who won a prize at the Paris Academy in 1730.
His signed and dated works painted in England range from 1736 to 1743. His portrait style is a compound of Hudson and Van Loo. He seems to have toured the provinces, particularly the Midlands, where he he had a good portrait practice among the gentry; his name is variously recorded as Rischoot or van Risquet. He is also believed to have worked in Scotland.

SIZE: 38 x 32.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Deceased estate, Berkshire.
Ref: 8752
This item has been sold




Portrait of a Gentleman c.1780, attributed to Francis Alleyne
SOLD....Oil on oval canvas in Georgian carved wood frame.

A charming small portrait of a young gentleman holding what is probably a riding crop.
This is Alleyne's favourite size of canvas.

FRANCIS ALLEYNE (working 1774 - 1790).
Alleyne was an itinerant portrait painter visiting country houses mainly in the south-east of England. He specialised in small, oval three-quarter lengths; these are often highly sensitive and of considerable charm.
Alleyne's portraits are often, but not always, signed on the back. This one is not.
He exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1774 and at the Society of Artists in 1790.

SIZE: 17.25 x 14.25 inches framed
15 x 12 inches canvas size.

PROVENANCE: a private South-East England collection.
Ref: 8454
This item has been sold



 
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