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Portrait of a Lady, Possibly Elizabeth Trentham, Viscountess Cullen c.1660; Circle or Studio of Lely.
Oil on canvas in a good carved and giltwood frame.

The sitter, possibly Elizabeth Trentham, holds, by its chain, a very fine and costly watch; the significance of this is not clear. It is most unusual for a female sitter to be shown with such an item...does it represent the inevitable passing of time? Was it the cherished possession of a deceased male relative? Attached to it is a black ribbon, symbol of mourning.

Regardless of the identity of this lady this is a high quality portrait by an artist strongly influenced by Lely's style of the early 1660s, to the extent of showing the sitter's left hand raising the material of her dress, as Lely often depicted his sitters doing; witness his portraits of Catherine of Braganza, Diana, Countess of Ailesbury and Frances Teresa Stuart.

Elizabeth Trentham was born in 1640, she was the daughter of Francis Trentham. She married Brien Cokayne, 2nd Viscount Cullen of Co. Tipperary, son of Charles Cokayne, 1st Viscount Cullen and Lady Mary O'Brien, before 1 April 1657.
She became Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Consort Catherine.
She died on 30 November 1713.
(Image 8 shows a portrait of Viscountess Cullen, painted by Sir Peter Lely, at Kingston Lacy, Dorset.)

SIR PETER LELY (1618 - 1680) was the most important portraitist in the reign of Charles ll, although he had painted portraits throughout the Commonwealth. Dutch born as Pieter van der Faes, he became Principal Painter to the King, painting everyone of importance and maintaining a busy and active Studio to help with the huge demand for his portraits. Members of his Circle, many of them talented artists in their own right, emulated his style to supply this constant market.

SIZE: 55 x 46.25 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: French Private Collection.
English Private Collection.
Verso: fragmentary old Parisian storage label and two inventory numbers.

Ref: 8775
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Lawyer c. 1820: Circle of Reinagle.
Oil on canvas (now mounted on board) in reproduction gilt frame.

The sitter, a member of the legal profession, sits at ease at his desk upon which are legal documents, a quill pen in an inkstand and various books on the law, including 'Coke Upon Littleton' and 'Blackstone's Commentaries'.

RAMSAY RICHARD REINAGLE, (19 March 1775 - 17 November 1862) was an English portrait, landscape, and animal painter, and son of Philip Reinagle, he was a pupil of his father, whose style he followed. He exhibited at the Royal Academy as early as 1788. He afterwards went to Italy, and was studying in Rome in 1796. Subsequently he visited Holland in order to study from the Dutch masters.
Reinagle exhibited portraits and landscapes in oil at the Royal Academy, of which he became an associate in 1814, and an academician in 1823.

PLEASE NOTE: There is also a similarity to the work of the American artist REMBRANDT PEALE (1778-1860). Peale was an artist and museum keeper. A prolific portrait painter, he was especially acclaimed for his likenesses of presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Peale's style was influenced by French Neoclassicism after a stay in Paris in his early thirties.

SIZE: 40.75 x 39.75 inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Somerset.
Ref: 8639
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Nobleman 1639; Follower of Cornelius Johnson.
Oil on canvas in a fine late 17th century carved and giltwood frame.
To the left, the sitters coat of arms and his age, 27, and the date 1639.
As yet unidentified, the arms are those of a peer of the realm as witnessed by the helmet with a grille of gold. Unusually, the arms have supporters in the form of 'wildmen' or 'woodwose'; supporters are rare and a great honour in heraldry.


"In the 1630s even a simple black suit of a quality fit for court wear cost as much as the rent of a London house for a year, clothes are vital signifiers of rank and wealth"
' Cavalier' by Lucy Worsley, Chief Curator of the Historic Royal Palaces.

In a period when black clothing was the fashion artists strove to depict the different nuances and textures of the fabrics as convincingly as possible.
They found that black is an ideal background with which to contrast the crisp white linen and rich lace and this dramatically accentuates the face and hand gestures. This extreme opposition between black and white is both austere and exciting, and is a characteristic feature of portraiture of this period.


CORNELIUS JOHNSON (Jonson, Jansen, Van Ceulen) 1593-1661 was born in London, the son of Flemish emigres.
Although Waterhouse thought he was trained in Holland it seems more likely (as Collins Baker has it) that Marcus Gheeraerts was his master in London.
Johnson is the most satisfying and 'English' of the portraitists working in England in the 1620s to 40s. He has a fine technique with a restrained and introspective style, with careful attention to the costume details.
His accurate portraits are never flattering but a sober and objective portrayal of his usual sitters: the gentry and lesser nobility. His style, and that of his circle of course, is easily identified by its coolness and restraint.

In 1632 he was made Painter to the King, but his wife's fears of the approaching Civil War caused him to retire to Holland in 1643. He continued to paint for the rest of his life, but was reportedly ruined by the extravagance of his second wife and died a poor man in Utrecht in 1661.

SIZE:37.5 x 32 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Country House Collection, County Durham.
Verso: old trade label for 'Joseph Cooke, Art Connoisseur' of Aston, Birmingham.

Ref: 8900
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Nobleman 1696, by Joseph-Guillaume du Plessis (Flanders 1653-1715 Marseille)
Oil on canvas in well carved and giltwood frame. Signed and dated 1696 lower left.
Verso, a fragmentary handwritten label. (see Image 5).

A charming small scale portrait of a French nobleman, his books prominently shown to his left; above his right hand can be seen a sphinx, a symbol of arcane wisdom and knowledge.
The point is clearly that this young man is not merely a fashionably dressed aristocrat but a man of culture and learning.

This type of portrait was usually on a larger scale e.g. 50 x 40 inches; the fact that this is 'in small' suggests that it was for the 'cabinet'...the intimate room for favoured possessions that was so fashionable during the Baroque period. Perhaps painted for a wife or lover?

SIZE: 30 x 26.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Collection of a Fellow of a Cambridge college.
Ref: 8780
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Nobleman c. 1635; attributed to Cornelius Johnson.
Oil on canvas in giltwood period frame.

This sensitive portrait of a gentleman, perhaps a nobleman, is typical of Johnson's best work.
The sitter has a pensive appearance...looking at the artist, but his thoughts seem far away.


CORNELIUS JOHNSON (Jonson, Jansen, Van Ceulen), 1593-1661, was one of the most gifted and prolific artists working in England in the 1620s and 1630s. Born in London but of Flemish and German extraction, he is thought to have trained as an artist in the northern Netherlands before establishing himself in England around 1618. This portrait was painted about 1635, at the height of his popularity, and three years after he was appointed as ‘his Majesty’s servant in ye quality of Picture drawer’ to Charles I. It is a compelling example of Johnson’s restrained, intimate portrayals for which he was renowned, and shows characteristic attention to detail in a style and pattern that Johnson had perfected by the 1630s for his half-length portraits.
His portraits are very sensitive to character, beautifully drawn and meticulously painted.
Johnson always preferred the feigned oval, suggestive of miniatures, of which his own began in 1625.

In a period when black clothing was the fashion (a dense black being very expensive to obtain) artists strove to depict the different nuances and textures of the fabrics as convincingly as possible.
They found that black is an ideal background with which to contrast the crisp white linen and rich lace and this dramatically accentuates the face and hand gestures. This extreme opposition between black and white is both austere and exciting, and is a characteristic feature of portraiture of this period.
Typical of Johnson is the attention he pays to the detail of his sitter's costly garments; in Image 5
his detail on this close up is almost photographic. It shows how fine the lace and linen of the falling band actually is and an indication that the slashes have been finished off with very small hems by the tailor to avoid fraying.


Johnson is the most satisfying and 'English' of the portraitists working in England in the 1620s and 30s. He has a fine technique with a restrained and introspective style, with careful attention to the costume details.
His accurate portraits are never flattering but a sober and objective portrayal of his usual sitters: the gentry and lesser nobility. His style is easily identified by its coolness and restraint.

In 1632 he was made Painter to the King, but his wife's fears of the approaching Civil War caused him to retire to Holland in 1643. He continued to paint for the rest of his life, but was reportedly ruined by the extravagance of his second wife and died a poor man in Utrecht in 1661.

SIZE:34 x 29 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:
*Christie's, London, 27 May 1988, Lot 98 (as Circle of Cornelis Jonson van Ceulen).
*Private Collection.

Verso: damaged old label "140. C....... Portrait of a noblema.."
Ref: 8738
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Noblewoman, said to be Queen Henrietta Maria, c.1640; Follower of Daniel Mytens.
A small full length portrait, oil on canvas in giltwood frame.


In this elegant portrait, an exquisite version 'in little' of a life-size Court painting, the sitter is resting in a chair of estate and wearing extremely rich Court clothing and jewellery.
The portrait itself has a jewel-like quality enhanced by the sitter's almost doll-like appearance.
In the Rushbrooke Hall inventory of paintings this portrait was always referred to as Queen Henrietta Maria, but the attribution is doubtful. (The late Mr. Quinn did not agree; see below).

Of cabinet size the painting has a great theatrical sense, using a combination of drapery and pose. (The 'cabinet' in the 17th century was a small, intimate room in which were kept items important to the owner,and only their closest friends would be admitted).

HENRIETTA MARIA of France (1609 – 1669) was the Queen consort of England, Scotland and Ireland as the wife of King Charles I. She was mother of two kings, Charles II and James II and grandmother of two queens and one king, Mary II, William III and Anne of Great Britain as well as paternal aunt of Louis XIV of France.

Her Catholic religion made her unpopular in England, and also prohibited her from being crowned in an Anglican service; therefore she never had a coronation. She began to immerse herself in national affairs as civil war loomed on the horizon, when the English Civil War began in 1642, Henrietta Maria was in Europe.
She returned to England in 1643 when she landed in Yorkshire with troops. She joined up with Royalist forces in the north and made her headquarters in York. She moved to Oxford to be with Charles but fled to France in July 1644 following the birth of her youngest daughter, Henrietta Anne when the position of the Royalists looked bleak; here she remained along with her sons.

Her husband's execution in 1649 was a terrible blow. She brought up her youngest child Henrietta in her own faith, but her efforts to persuade her youngest son, the Duke of Gloucester, to take the same course only produced discomfort in the exiled family.
The story of her marriage with her attached servant Lord Jermyn needs more confirmation than it has yet received to be accepted, but all the information which has reached us of her relations with her children points to the estrangement which had grown up between them.
After the Restoration she returned to England when she found that she had no place in the new world. She received from Parliament a grant of £30,000 a year in compensation for the loss of her dower-lands, and the King added a similar sum as a pension from himself.
In January 1661 she returned to France to be present at the marriage of her daughter Henrietta to the Duke of Orleans.
In July 1662 she set out again for England, and took up her residence once more at Somerset House. Her health failed her, and on the 24th of June 1665, she departed in search of the clearer air of her native country.
She died on the 31st of August 1666, at Colombes, not far from Paris.

Daniël Mijtens (Delft, c. 1590 – The Hague, 1647/48), known in England as DANIEL MYTENS the Elder, was a Dutch portrait painter who spent the central years of his career working in England. He was born in Delft into a family of artists and trained in The Hague, possibly in the studio of Van Mierevelt.

SIZE: 27.5 x 18.5 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE:
*Rushbrooke Hall, Suffolk until the contents sale of 1919. (Image 5)
*Nowton Cottage, Suffolk until 2010. (Image 6)
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
*Collection of the late John Quinn, Kent.
(Mr. Quinn had a theory, backed up by his research, that this portrait was of Queen Henrietta Maria and contains extensive coded references to her relationship with Lord Jermyn. All this information is available to the purchaser, should they wish it.)

Verso: old label: 'Francis Collins from Great Portland Street.
Ref: 8791
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Boy and his Dog c. 1820; Circle of Sir Thomas Beechey.
Oil on canvas in giltwood frame.

Painted in the late Georgian period, the boy and his pet spaniel are in a flower filled landscape; his hoop and stick in his right hand, it seems as if the two have just paused on their way to play.
The identity of the sitter is not known, but clearly he is from a wealthy family...the clothes and the fact that the portrait is full-length testify to that.

SIR WILLIAM BEECHEY RA FSA (1753-1839). He was born in Burford, Oxfordshire and entered the Royal Academy Schools in 1774.
After some years in London he moved to Norwich, then a very important city, where he enjoyed a good practice painting conversation pieces, and life size portraits from c.1783. He returned to London in 1787 and worked from Brook Street; he became extremely successful and moved to Hill Street, Berkeley Square, then to Hanover Square and ultimately to Harley Street.
He was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy in 1793, then RA in 1798 and was knighted in 1798 (the first artist to receive this honour since Reynolds).
Beechey was appointed Portrait Painter to Queen Charlotte in 1793 and by 1814 Portrait Painter to Her Majesty and to HRH the Duke of Gloucester.

SIZE:55 x 36 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Holland Park, London.
Ref: 8753
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Boy c 1680, by Mary Beale.
Oil on canvas in period carved and giltwood frame.

A charming portrait of a young boy, typical of Beale's sensitive approach to painting children. As here, Beale invariably accords her portraits of children with tenderness and a distinctively sympathetic characterisation. The sitter is almost certainly the brother of the portrait of the girl by Beale also on this website.

MARY BEALE (1633-1699) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.

She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street. Mary Beale was not the only female painter in England, but her name alone has survived as that of the only woman to make a successful living, and to enjoy a flourishing practice as a portraitist.

The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits. Her surviving works, however, suggest far more the artist who was a close friend of Sir Peter Lely and widely reckoned to be Van Dyck's most accomplished copyist. Her grasp of Lely's colouring is evident, but the pleasant and direct manner in which she treats her sitters is entirely her own.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

SIZE: 34 x 28.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Wiltshire Private Collection.
Ref: 8981
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Boy c.1690; Circle of Charles D'Agar.
Oil on canvas in a 19th century frame.

A charming portrait of a young aristocratic boy with his bow and a quiver of arrows.
He is depicted standing next to a column which is not just a fashionable conceit of the artist but also signifies that this boy is to be the pillar of his house, i.e. this is the heir of a noble family.

Early recreational archery societies included the Finsbury Archers and the Kilwinning Papingo, established in 1688. The latter held competitions in which the archers had to dislodge a wooden parrot from the top of an abbey tower. The Company of Scottish Archers was formed in 1676 and is one of the oldest sporting bodies in the world.

CHARLES D'AGAR (1669 - 1723) came to England with his Huguenot father Jacques in 1681, settling here permanently after a stay in Copenhagen by 1691. He had a good practice, numbering such people as the Duke of Buccleuch and Lord Bolingbroke among his patrons.

D'Agar painted very much in the style of Michael Dahl, whose portraits of children are very similar, especially in the treatment of the hair, and they often employ the same staging device, whereby the sitter is placed on a terrace, a landscape beyond.

SIZE: 55 x 42 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Oxfordshire Private Collection.
Ref: 8777
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Boy with a Dog c.1740; English School.
Oil on canvas in giltwood period frame.

Painted within a feigned oval, the young boy looks confidentally out at the viewer, standing with relaxed elegance...one hand on his hip, the other on his dog.
Although the animal was probably his pet, in portraiture a dog represents fidelity and trust; also when included in a child's portrait it can signify how children, like animals, need to be trained and disciplined to become responsible adults.

The artist is an unknown provincial; although he has been influenced somewhat by the fashionable portrait painter Charles Jervas his style has a direct, slightly naive quality which has great appeal.

SIZE: 34.5 x 30 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Lincolnshire.
Ref: 8846
This item has been sold



 
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