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Portrait of a Young Gentleman c. 1680; Attributed to Mary Beale.
Oil on canvas in 18th century giltwood frame.

A fine portrait of a handsome young man; he looks directly and thoughtfully at the viewer. The sitter is contained within a feigned stone oval...a favourite conceit of the artist.
The portrait is typical of the pleasant and direct manner in which Beale depicted her sitters.

MARY BEALE (1633-1699) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.

She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street.

The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

SIZE: 37 x 31.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Oxfordshire Private Collection.
Ref: 8684
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Gentleman c.1805; Circle of Sir Henry Raeburn.
Oil on canvas in original giltwood frame.


In this portrait the light that falls right to left across the sitter's face emphasises the modelling to suggest strength of character and purpose, and with the tousled hair creates a sense of drama. Raeburn's portraits have an understated beauty and sheer physical presence, with a dynamic, romantic quality that matched the spirit of the times.
These, along with an innate grasp of likeness, are the qualities that assured Raeburn's popularity with the gentry of his native Scotland and then - as his reputation spread - with London society.

SIR HENRY RAEBURN (1756-1823) was born the son of a manufacturer in Stockbridge, on the Water of Leith; a former village now within the city of Edinburgh. Orphaned, he was supported by his older brother and placed in Heriot's Hospital, where he received an education. At the age of fifteen he was apprenticed to the goldsmith James Gilliland of Edinburgh, Soon he took to the production of carefully finished portrait miniatures; meeting with success and patronage, he extended his practice to oil painting, at which he was self-taught.
Gilliland watched the progress of his pupil with interest, and introduced him to David Martin, who had been the favourite assistant of Allan Ramsay the Latter, and was now the leading portrait painter in Edinburgh. Raeburn soon he gained sufficient skill to make him decide to devote himself exclusively to painting.

Raeburn spent his life in Edinburgh, rarely visiting London, and then only for brief periods, thus preserving his individuality. Scottish art gained much from his disinclination to leave his native land. He became the acknowledged chief of the school which was growing up in Scotland during the earlier years of the 19th century, and his example and influence at a critical period were of major importance.

In 1812 he was elected president of the Society of Artists in Edinburgh, in 1814 Associate, and in the following year full Member of the Royal Scottish Academy. On 29 August 1822 he was knighted by George IV and appointed His Majesty's Limner for Scotland at the Earl of Hopetoun house. He died in Edinburgh.

Raeburn had all the essential qualities of a popular and successful portrait painter. He was able to produce a telling and forcible likeness; his work is distinguished by powerful characterisation, stark realism, dramatic and unusual lighting effects.

SIZE: 38.5 x 33.75 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Dorset
Ref: 8911
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Girl c.1675; by Mary Beale
Oil on canvas in period carved and giltwood frame.

A charming portrait of a young girl wearing a 'Roman' robe draped over her shoulder; this is not a garment she would ever have worn in her everyday life. Its purpose was to suggest the Classical world of Ancient Rome, so fashionable at the time. This was known as "elevating the sitter" and was thought to confer a timeless quality upon the portrait.
The young lady is depicted within a beautifully painted feigned stone oval, bearing fruit. This motif was used so often by Beale as to be almost her trademark. It also was intended to be a Classical reminder.

MARY BEALE (1633-1699) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.

She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street.

The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

SIZE: 35 x 30 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: From the Collection of Viscount Cowdray, Cowdray Park, Sussex where it hung in Lady Cowdray's Bedchamber.
(Image 4 shows the house from the air).
Verso: an illegible 19th c. Exhibition label and a further old label for "William Young, Fine Art Collector and Dealer in Articles of Value"
Ref: 9595
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Girl c1680, by Mary Beale.
Oil on canvas in period carved and giltwood frame.

A charming portrait of a young lady, typical of Beale's sensitive approach to painting children. As here, Beale invariably accords her portraits of children with tenderness and a distinctively sympathetic characterisation. The sitter is almost certainly the sister of the Young boy painted by Beale also on this website.

MARY BEALE (1633-1699) was born in Barrow, Suffolk, the daughter of John Cradock, a Puritan rector. Her mother, Dorothy, died when she was 10. Her father was an amateur painter, and member of the Painter-Stainers' Company, and she was acquainted with local artists, such as Nathaniel Thach, Matthew Snelling, Robert Walker and Peter Lely. In 1652, at the age of 18, she married Charles Beale, a cloth merchant from London - also an amateur painter.

She became a semi-professional portrait painter in the 1650s and 1660s, working from her home, first in Covent Garden and later in Fleet Street. Mary Beale was not the only female painter in England, but her name alone has survived as that of the only woman to make a successful living, and to enjoy a flourishing practice as a portraitist.

The family moved to a farmhouse in Allbrook, Hampshire in 1665 due to financial difficulties, her husband having lost his position as a patent clerk, and also due to the Great Plague of London. For the next five years, a 17th-century two storey timber-framed building was her family home and studio.
She returned to London in 1670, where she established a studio in Pall Mall, with her husband working as her assistant, mixing her paints and keeping her accounts. She became successful, and her circle of friends included Thomas Flatman, poet Samuel Woodford, Archbishop of Canterbury John Tillotson, and Bishops Edward Stillingfleet and Gilbert Burnet.
She became reacquainted with Sir Peter Lely, now Court Artist to Charles II. Her later work is heavily influenced by Lely, being mainly small portraits. Her surviving works, however, suggest far more the artist who was a close friend of Sir Peter Lely and widely reckoned to be Van Dyck's most accomplished copyist. Her grasp of Lely's colouring is evident, but the pleasant and direct manner in which she treats her sitters is entirely her own.
Mary Beale died in 1699 in Pall Mall, and was buried at St. James's, Piccadilly in London. Her husband died in 1705.

SIZE: 34 x 28.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Wiltshire Private Collection.
Ref: 8982
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Italian Aristocratic Boy c.1630; Circle of Tiberio di Tito.
Oil on canvas in a slim gilt modern frame.

This utterly charming portrait of a little boy standing in the 'swagger' pose of a powerful adult has great appeal.
The young aristocrat is dressed in incredibly costly clothing, this, plus the fact of his being painted at such a young age, points to him being the heir to a very wealthy and important family.
In his clothing, pose and the velvet draped background he is depicted in exactly the same manner as would have been an important adult.

This portrait was selected by John Fowler, of Colefax and Fowler, in the 1950s, for the drawing room at Hambleden Manor, home of the Viscountess Hambleden.
It hung there until this year when the countess moved to a smaller property on the estate.
The decoration and furnishing of Hambleden Manor is regarded as one of Fowler's earliest major achievements.
(Image 7 shows the Manor and image 8 this portrait in situ.)


TIBERIO DI TITO (1573–1627) was an Italian painter, born in Florence. He was the son and pupil of the late-Mannerist painter Santi di Tito. He specialized in portrait painting, including small pencil portraits.
As one of the official portraitists at the Medici Court, he was much employed by Cardinal Leopoldo de' Medici.

SIZE:46.25 x 36.75 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Viscountess Hambleden, Hambleden Manor.
Ref: 8762
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Lady 1614; by Laurenz Strauch.
Oil on canvas in a reproduction frame of period type.
Inscribed 'SUAE 22, 1614' (Aged 22), and signed with a monogram LS.

In this lovely and poignant portrait, the young woman is heavily pregnant and looks out with a calm expression.
Childbirth was a dangerous time for both the woman and the child, deaths were frequent and it is known that some portraits were commissioned in case the sitter died.
As Lady Massingberd wrote to her daughter "Ye safe dylevery in child bearth is God's one work. Pray spare as much time as you can for meddetation and prayer to acquaint yrself with God."
Such may have been the thoughts of this sitter.

These pregnancy portraits are very rare, for instance, "there are no examples of pregnant women in Dutch portraiture" (Marieke de Winkel 'The Interpretation of Dress in Vermeer's Paintings').
Portraits in other European countries did, as this one does, occasionally show the sitter as obviously and indisputably with child, but they are uncommon. In England, in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, they can be more frequently seen, but still only a handful.

In this portrait the young woman's right hand rests protectively over her bump. This is a well observed gesture and testifies to the artist's interest in a naturalism which was rare at this date.
Symbolism abounds in this lovely painting: the sitter holds rosemary to her body; this was a symbol of fidelity and fertility, but also of remembrance.
To the left of the the young woman we see a fig, the first tree mentioned in the Bible, and therefore redolent of faith and abundance, and fertility linked to femininity.
Its many seeds also symbolise unity and knowledge. Only found in Mediterranean countries, in Northern Europe it was an expensive delicacy, and was seen as a sign of prosperity and wealth.
There is also a lemon, again an expensive Southern food item, but its meaning was that it was like life...attractive to look at but bitter to the taste...the deceptive allure of earthly beauty.
The bowl seems to contain plums which are a symbol of spring, immortality and fidelity.
The evidence of her jewelled belt and rings demonstrate the wealth of this young lady, but the overriding feeling of the portrait is one of hope for the future.
IMAGE 5 shows a portrait of a man by Strauch, signed and dated 1613. The sitter also holds a sprig of rosemary and he faces to our right, thus making a pair with our portrait. We believe that this portrait could well be the husband.

LAURENZ STRAUCH (1554-1630) worked in Nürnberg as an etcher and as a painter. He was educated by his father Hans Strauch and influenced by the Flemish portrait painter Nicolas Neufchatel.
He was a prominent portrait painter for the local patricians. Strauch's portraits, the earliest from 1581, were almost exclusively made for them, for example Clara Praun (1588; Nuremberg, Ger. Nmus.), and craftsmen, such as Christoph Jamnitzer (1597; Nuremberg, Ger. Nmus.). While his likenesses are rather stiff and lack the warmth of Neufchatel's better paintings, Strauch excelled at reproducing the jewellery and dress of his sitters. His portrait of Johann Neudorfer and his son is in the Alte Pinakothek in Munich. A self portrait from 1614 can be found at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum in Nürnberg. His etchings provide us with a picturesque view of the Nürnberg of his time.

Our thanks to the art historian Adam Busiakiwicz who identified the artist.

SIZE: 44 x 34.5 inches including frame.
PROVENANCE: Sussex Private Collection for many years.





Ref: 8934
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Lady c. 1660: Attributed to Gerard Soest.
Oil on canvas in a later ebonised oval frame.

The young lady looks out at the viewer with a thoughtful expression, typical of Soest's work. He was a painter of exceptional distinction, and with sitters whose introspection matched perhaps his own, as here, could achieve a degree of sensitivity that eluded Lely.
Vertue thought that, unlike Lely, he refused to flatter his female sitters into a fashionable sameness. Waterhouse thought him to be perhaps the most sensitive of Lely's rivals. John Riley was a pupil.

GERARD SOEST (Zoust)(c.1600 - 1681), portrait-painter, is usually stated to have been born in Westphalia. It is more probable that he was, like Sir Peter Lely, a native of Soest, near Utrecht, as his portraits have some affinity to those of the Utrecht school. He appears to have been born early in the century, but nothing is known of him until 1656, when he came to London, already in some repute as a painter, and quickly obtained employment with the nobility and gentry after the Restoration. His portraits are carefully and strongly painted, the character of the sitter being well preserved, but his somewhat uncompromising style was tempered by a study of the works of Vandyck in order to suit the English taste.

SIZE:31 x 25 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Dorset.
Ref: 8912
This item has been sold





PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG LADY C. 1690/1710; CIRCLE OF KNELLER.
Oil on canvas in elaborate gilded frame.
A charming portrait of a young lady wearing the daring 'undress' so fashionable at the time.
The sitter looks out at the viewer with a confident, almost amused expression; her right hand is touching her head...in portraiture a symbol of thought.
This painting is of an intimate 'cabinet' size; the 'cabinet' was a small private room in which the owner kept his or her most treasured items.

SIR GODFREY KNELLER (1646-1723) was the most distinguished painter of baroque portraits in England.
Born in Lubeck, he trained with Bol and Rembrandt, coming to London in 1676.
By 1679 he had painted the King and remained the most famous and successful portrait painter in England until his death.
In 1688 he was made Principal Painter to the King and was knighted in 1692 and a made a baronet in 1715.
His style had a profound influence on British portraiture and a large number of artists, some very talented in their own right, emulated his fashionable style.

SIZE: 13.75 x 11.75 inches canvas.
21.25 x 19 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE:
Private Collection, a Norfolk Country House.
With Roy Precious Fine Art.
Collection of a Fellow of a Cambridge College.
Ref: 8969
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Lady c.1675; Circle of John Michael Wright.
Oil on canvas in reproduction frame.

A charming portrait of a young woman wearing a rich 'Roman' robe draped over her shoulder; this is not a garment she would ever have worn in her everyday life. Its purpose was to suggest the Classical world of Ancient Rome, so fashionable at the time. This was known as "elevating the sitter" and was thought to confer a timeless quality upon the portrait.
The young woman is clearly not much more than a girl, this would be her first 'adult' portrait and probably signified her entrance into the marriage market; 13 to 14 years old was the age this usually occurred in upmarket circles. She appears confident and poised, yet there is a hint of thoughtfulness behind that look.

JOHN MICHAEL WRIGHT (1617-1694) was one of the most successful native English artists of the seventeenth century. With earlier contemporaries such as Robert Walker and William Dobson, he was one of only a few English painters to find favour amongst the top echelons of society. At the height of his fame, he styled himself ‘Pictor Regius’ [The King’s Painter]
His career was all the more remarkable in an era when patrons continued their traditional preference for foreign artists, as they had done from Holbein to Van Dyck.

Wright’s success lay in his uniquely diverse artistic background and training. Although born in London, he first trained in Scotland under George Jamesone. He then left for Italy and stayed in Rome for a decade from 1642, working amongst contemporaries such as Poussin and Velazquez. In 1648 he became a member of the Academy of St Luke. He returned to London in 1656, after having spent time in France and Flanders.
No other English artist before Wright had travelled and studied so extensively on the Continent.

Wright is currently rated as one of the leading indigenous British painters of his generation, largely for the distinctive realism in his portraiture.

SIZE: canvas 30 x 25 inches.
frame 35.25 x 30.5 inches.

PROVENANCE:
*Collection of Murray T. Foster (Historian in Cullompton, Devon).
*Christie's, May 9th 1913, lot 281, 6gns.
*Private Collection.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
*Private Collection, Kent.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
*Private Collection, Sussex.

Verso: "Beneficiaries of ... Bateman."
Ref: 8960
This item has been sold





Portrait of a Young Lady c.1735 by Bartholomew Dandridge.
Oil on canvas in period style gilt frame.

A beautiful portrait of an attractive young lady, little more than a girl, standing in an architectural setting.
She holds a flower in her right hand and in her left a number of them are held before her abdomen. These flowers symbolise her youth, beauty, and her future fertility.

BARTHOLOMEW DANDRIDGE 1691-c.1755. His initial training was at the St Martin’s Lane Academy and with Sir Godfrey Kneller, whose studio and practice he took over in 1731 after the latter’s death.

Although trained in the style of Kneller, he was amongst the first in England to respond to the innovations of the rococo which were being imported into England from France in the early and mid 1730’s. These have a liveliness of composition and lightness and freshness of palette which divides them absolutely from the style of the 1720’s.

This painting, dating from about 1735, is a very early essay in this new English Rococo style, and shows the rapid development of the artist; the following year (1736-7) he painted the daughters of the Earl of Gainsborough in what by then was a fully developed French influenced style which looks more towards Watteau than it does towards Kneller.

SIZE: 44.25 x 36.25 inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Somerset Private Collection.
Verso: a label for the painting restorer Tim Everett of Taunton. In May 1994 Everett lined, restretchered and reframed this portrait, along with cleaning and expertly repairing several bad tears. In November 2013 the painting went to our restorer for any conservation required and he confirmed the quality of the 1990s work.
Ref: 8773
This item has been sold



 
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