Portrait of Prince Rupert, mid 17th century; ...

Item Ref
9068

Oil on canvas in a magnificent carved and gilt frame. It shows Rupert at about the age of 14 when he first became a soldier. After a pattern favoured by van Honthorst who painted Rupert, at different ages, several times. His Studio and those of his Circle produced a number of versions of van Honthorst's portraits of the senior Royalists.
Difficult to date precisely, most of these copies were produced around the middle of the 17th century, particularly during the time of the English Civil War and the King's execution in 1649. They were much in demand to adorn the private walls of Royalist supporters.

Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine, Duke of Bavaria, Duke of Cumberland, Earl of Holderness, commonly called PRINCE RUPERT OF THE RHINE, KG, PC, FRS ( 1619 – 1682), was a noted German soldier, admiral, scientist, sportsman, colonial governor and amateur artist during the 17th century. Rupert was a younger son of the German prince Frederick V, Elector Palatine and his wife Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of James I of England. Thus Rupert was the nephew of King Charles I of England, who made him Duke of Cumberland and Earl of Holderness, and the first cousin of King Charles II of England. His sister Electress Sophia was the mother of George I of Great Britain.
Prince Rupert had a varied career. He was a soldier from a young age, fighting against Spain in the Netherlands during the Eighty Years' War (1568–1648), and against the Holy Roman Emperor in Germany during the Thirty Years' War (1618–48). Aged 23, he was appointed commander of the Royalist cavalry during the English Civil War (1642–46), becoming the archetypal Cavalier of the war and ultimately the senior Royalist general. He surrendered after the fall of Bristol and was banished from England. He served under Louis XIV of France against Spain, and then as a Royalist privateer in the Caribbean. Following the Restoration, Rupert returned to England, becoming a senior British naval commander during the Second and Third Anglo-Dutch wars, engaging in scientific invention, art, and serving as the first Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company. Rupert died in England in 1682, aged 62.
Rupert is considered to have been a quick-thinking and energetic cavalry general, but ultimately undermined by his youthful impatience in dealing with his peers during the Civil War. In the Interregnum, Rupert continued the conflict against Parliament by sea from the Mediterranean to the Caribbean, showing considerable persistence in the face of adversity. As the head of the Royal Navy in his later years, he showed greater maturity and made impressive and long-lasting contributions to the Royal Navy's doctrine and development. As a colonial governor, Rupert shaped the political geography of modern Canada—Rupert's Land was named in his honour. Rupert's varied and numerous scientific and administrative interests combined with his considerable artistic skills made him one of the more colourful individuals of the Restoration period.

GERRIT VAN HONTHORST (1592 – 1656) was a Dutch Golden Age painter; born in Utrecht,
He built a considerable reputation both in the Dutch Republic and abroad. Queen Elizabeth of Bohemia, mother of Prince Rupert, sister of Charles I of England, then in exile in the Netherlands, commissioned Honthorst as a painter. Through her he became known to King Charles, who invited him to England in 1628.
After his return to Utrecht, Honthorst retained the patronage of the English monarch, painting for him, in 1631, a large picture of the king and queen of Bohemia and all their children. His popularity in the Netherlands was such that he opened a second studio in the Hague, where he painted portraits of members of the court. These were large studios, where the work of his assistants included making replicas of Honthorst's royal portraits.
SIZE: 32.5 x 28.5 inches including frame.
PROVENANCE: Wiltshire Private Collection.
£12,950

Portrait of James Bishop c.1703, by Bartholomeus ...

Item Ref
9136

Oil on canvas in the original fine carved and giltwood frame. Inscribed upper left 'James Bishop. Born May 7 1690'.
James Bishop of Lower Tre-Kyninge, Cornwall, has reached the age where it is appropriate to wear the large full bottomed wig so fashionable at the time; his hand held elegantly in a pose much favoured by gentlemen and aristocrats.

The Bishops were a Cornish gentry family, possessed of several estates. However, when Anne Bishop, sole daughter and heiress of James Bishop Esq, of Lower Tre-Kyninge, married Hugh Rogers Esq, High Sheriff of Cornwall, in 1770, all Bishop possessions passed to the Rogers family.
In late 2018 Charles Rogers of Penrose House died, and in 2019 this portrait and others were sold.
This portrait is not signed by the artist, but others in the collection were, and it is obvious that the same hand was responsible. The signature was 'B. Burghende'. This was Bartholomeus van Burgindis, a Dutch artist, working from 1663-1703. He painted many of the Cornish gentry and one of his portraits is in The Royal Cornwall Museum; Dr. Nathaniel Spry, dated 1703.

SIZE: 34.5 x 29.25 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: By descent through the Bishop and Rogers families of Penrose Estate, Porthleven, Cornwall.
£4,750

Portrait of Jean Davidson, Mrs. Robertson, 18th ...

Item Ref
8910

Oil on canvas in a distressed 19th century frame.
This is a pleasing 18th century portrait of an attractive sitter with Jacobite connections.

JEAN DAVIDSON married Andrew Robertson, owner of the Scottish estate of Foveran. Jean, Countess of Dunfermline was her godmother.
Andrew's brother William was in the bodyguard of Bonnie Prince Charlie at the Battle of Culloden. After the defeat to the Jacobite forces he fled to Sweden where he made a fortune. After some years he returned and bought an estate in Scotland.
His cousin James, 5th Earl of Southesk, had been attainted for the Jacobite Rising in 1715 and the earldom was not restored until 1855.
Andrew, Jean's husband, quarrelled with their eldest son William and he left the estate of Foveran to William's brother. Alexander, William's son, as his father did not inherit the estate went to live in China where he made a fortune. Returning home he spent it all so he returned to China where he made another(moderate) fortune.
ALLAN RAMSAY 1713–1784.
Ramsay was born in Edinburgh; he studied in London at St Martin's Lane Academy and at Hans Hysing's studio, before going to Italy to study. On his return he settled in London, although he continued to be active in Edinburgh. Between 1754 and 1757 he was in Italy, mostly in Rome. During his prime period he had a virtual monopoly on court painting. He became the official painter to George III in 1760, and Principal Painter-in-Ordinary in 1767. His assistants included David Martin, Alexander Nasmyth and Philip Reinagle.
SIZE:34.25 x 29 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Dorset.
£1,850

Portrait of Benjamin Haworth c. 1750; Circle ...

Item Ref
8994

Oil on canvas in a modern reproduction frame.

The sitter, Benjamin Haworth, is shown in a pose very fashionable at that time...that of a sporting country gentleman, with his dog and fowling piece.

The Haworths were an old and influential Yorkshire family of Haworth Hall, Dunswell, Hull, Yorkshire. They were timber merchants and extensive landowners, some of them Baronets.
The Blaydes and the Booths were rich and powerful merchant families who had married into the Haworths. Like the aristocracy these wealthy merchants married within their peers, always with an eye on increasing their wealth and power.
BENJAMIN HAWORTH was born in 1728, son of Thomas Haworth (also on this website) and Mary Blaydes, daughter of Benjamin Blaydes.
Benjamin Haworth married Anne, daughter of John Booth, in 1756. Their son Benjamin Blaydes Haworth (also on this website) was born in 1763 and became Sheriff of Hull in 1813.
Benjamin died in 1798.

ALLAN RAMSAY 1713–1784.
Ramsay was born in Edinburgh. His father, also Allan Ramsay, was an important Scottish poet from whom the younger Ramsay inherited a tradition of strong nationalistic pride. Ramsay junior was instrumental in formulating a native Scottish style of painting, as his father had done for poetry.
Ramsay studied in London at St Martin's Lane Academy and at Hans Hysing's studio, before going to Italy. He worked from 1736 to 1738 at the French Academy in Rome under Francesco Imperiali and under Francesco Solimena in Naples. On his return he settled in London, although he continued to be active in Edinburgh. Between 1754 and 1757 he was in Italy, mostly in Rome. He was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1743. During his prime period he had a virtual monopoly on court painting. He became the official painter to George III in 1760, and Principal Painter-in-Ordinary in 1767. His assistants included David Martin, Alexander Nasmyth and Philip Reinagle.

SIZE: 49.75 x 41 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Haworth Hall, then by descent in the family to a branch which settled in Oxfordshire. Deceased estate.
Verso: old handwritten label identifying the sitter.
£8,650

Portrait of a Lady of the Palmer ...

Item Ref
9208

The lady is traditionally identified as a member of the Palmer family of Dorney Court, Berkshire.
The sitter, fashionably dressed in her daring 'undress', looks confidently at the viewer. This is a good example of the typical society portrait of the time and representative of Murray's best work. The use of the feigned stone oval was typical of the period.
The hand carved and gilded frame is a work of art in its own right.

THOMAS MURRAY 1663 – 1734.
He received his first lessons in art from one of the De Critz family. Subsequently he became a pupil of John Riley.
His works of before 1700 are more independent of the style of Sir Godfrey Kneller than his later portraits
Murray was successful financially. He died in June 1734, leaving no children, and bequeathed his money to a nephew, with instructions that his monument, with a bust, should be erected in Westminster Abbey, provided that it did not cost too much. His nephew, however, taking him at his word, buried him in St. Paul's, Covent Garden, and found the monument too expensive to erect.
SIZE: 34.5 x 29.5 inches including frame.
PROVENANCE: Horton Lodge, Windsor, Berkshire.
£6,350

Double Portrait of a Lady and Gentleman ...

Item Ref
8602

Oil on canvas now mounted on board in fine period carved and giltwood frame.

This type of small scale portrait is known as a conversation piece and .."was the first real break with the stereotyped portraiture of the early 18th century. It was essentially a private rather than a public art form.
The aim of the coversation piece was to catch the sitter with family and friends in action, and Hogarth, a friend of Hayman's, succeeded extremely well at this." (Francis Hayman by Brian Allen).

Hogarth was a positive influence on Hayman as he had demonstrated that there was a good market for the small scale conversation piece.

In this portrait the male sitter has discarded his wig and wears a velvet cap of the type associated with artists, writers and other creative people. He also wears an expensive silk 'tea gown' to emphasise his relaxation at home. It is clear that the world of literature is being emphasised...a door opens onto a library, more books are on the table and the lady holds a volume with her finger marking her place.

The middle class panelled room is typical of Hayman and occurs many times in his conversation pieces and are, more often than not, a version of his own panelled studio.

FRANCIS HAYMAN R.A. (c.1708-1776) was born in Devon and painted scenery as well as genre, historical subjects and portraits. He had a successful career producing conversation pieces, theartical portraits and small full lengths through the 1740s and 50s, although he also painted on the scale of life. He helped in the foundation of the Society of Artists in 1760 and was President 1766-68; after which he became a Foundation Member of the Royal Academy, and its Librarian in 1771.
Among the pupils in his studio were Thomas Gainsborough R.A. and Nathaniel Dance R.A.

SIZE: 30 x 35 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Verso, handwritten label "Property of Major J.M.D. Wyatt, Roberstbridge House, Robertsbridge, Sussex"
The late major was the last member of the family which had connections with the D'Obrees in Guernsey.

£9,950

Portrait of William Helyar c. 1745: English ...

Item Ref
8918

Oil on canvas in a carved and giltwood frame.

The sitter, William Helyar (1723 - 1784) was a member of the family that owned Coker Court and had lordship over East Coker, Somerset from 1616 to 1914. They also had an estate at Canonteign in Devon, and Sedghill in Wiltshire. The family came originally from Devon, where they seem to have been of importance as the William Helyar of that time represented Melcomb-Regis in Parliament in the reigns of Richard II and Henry IV.

William Cary sold the manor of East Coker in 1620 to William Helyar, archdeacon of Barnstaple, to be settled on the marriage of Christian or Christine, William Cary's eldest daughter, to Henry, son of William Helyar. Henry (d. 1634) was followed by his son William (d. 1697), his grandson William (d. 1742), and his great grandson William Helyar (d. 1784) who married Betty Weston. They had four daughters and six sons..William, his heir; Robert of Newton Park, Cornwall, who died in the army aged 23; Weston, who succeeded his brother at Newton Park and was a magistrate for Somerset; Edward, born 1743; Charles born 1750, an officer in the army, killed in the American War; John, in holy orders, rector of Hardington and Tollard Royal, in Wiltshire.
William was Sheriff of Somerset in 1764.

In 1812 William Helyar (d. 1820), son of the last, gave the manor to his son William (d. 1841) and he was followed in the direct male line by William (d. 1880) and Horace (d. 1893). Horace was succeeded by his daughter Dorothy who married Godfrey Walker Heneage. In 1914 the estate was put up for sale but lordship was not included.

(Coker Court is shown in Image 5)

SIZE: 35 x 30 inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:Deceased estate, Sussex.
Verso: old handwritten label; "William Helyar, eldest son of Mr. Helyar of Canonteign". Plate on the frame has the same inscription.
£4,750

Portrait of a Member of the Palmes ...

Item Ref
8991

Oil on canvas in gilded oakleaf frame.

The sitter, depicted with a feigned stone oval, wears a faux Roman military tunic beneath his cloak; this was called 'elevating the sitter' and was intended to give the portrait a timeless Classical quality, as was his silk drape....this despite his fashionable full wig and cravat! Lely, and others, used this motif on many occasions.

The PALMES family of Naburn Hall, York, and the cadet branches of Lindley Hall, North Yorkshire; Ashwell, Rutland; and Carcraig in Ireland, are an ancient English aristocratic family, noted for their adherence to Catholicism. The Palmes family of Naburn are directly descended from Mary Boleyn and her daughter, Catherine, who is generally believed to have been the daughter of Henry VIII of England while Mary was his mistress. Mary's sister, Anne Boleyn, afterwards became the second wife of Henry VIII and the mother of Elizabeth I of England:
The family were originally seated at Taunton Deane, Somerset, where Manfred de Palma/Palmes had by the "Gift of Milo Earl of Hereford & Constable of England, 53 Oxgangs of Land and 25 Messages in the Lordship of Taunton Dean". Manfred was "known to be living in the sixth year of the reign of King Stephen, 1140 AD".

The Palmes family of Naburn can trace its ancestry through a maternal line to Robert de Todeni (died 1088), a powerful Norman baron. Todeni's importance is reflected by the 80 estates in 11 counties that he was granted by William across England. His principal Lordship was at Belvoir where he built his home, Belvoir Castle, before establishing Belvoir Priory in 1076. Among Todeni's many estates was Naburn. In 1226, William Palmes of Taunton acquired the Lordship of Naburn through his marriage to Matilda, daughter or sister of Richard de Watterville; a direct descendant of Robert de Todeni from whom the land had passed to the Wattervilles. From then on, the estate continued to descend uninterrupted from father to son within the Palmes family until 1974, on the death of Commander George Bryan Palmes. The Palmes family were said to have been "unique in being able to boast an unbroken heritage". Edmund Burke described the family as "one of serious antiquity".

SIR PETER LELY (1618 - 1680) was the most important portraitist in the reign of Charles ll, although he had painted portraits throughout the Commonwealth. Principal Painter to the King, he painted everyone of importance, maintaining a busy and active Studio to help with the huge demand for his portraits. Members of his Circle, and his Followers, many of them talented artists in their own right, emulated his style to supply this constant market.

SIZE: 37.25 x 32.25 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: By descent through the Palmes family to a branch now resident in Kent.
£4,500

Portrait of a Boy with his Pets ...

Item Ref
8872

Oil on canvas in decorative frame.

An utterly charming naive portrait in which the animals almost have a cartoon quality.
The young boy firmly clutches a whistle and looks out as if lost in thought; meanwhile the cat and the spaniel stare fixedly at each other.
This portrait has such a feeling of humour that it makes the viewer smile.

SIZE: 35 x 29 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:From a Cambridgeshire country house.
£2,950

Portrait of 'Micky', 1920, by John Young-Hunter ...

Item Ref
micky

Oil on unlined canvas in a good quality gilded frame.
Inscribed 'Micky' and signed and dated 1920 lower left.
A charming portrait of the young girl 'Micky' painted in 1920, utterly evocative of its period and capturing the relaxed innocence of the child. The artist has used his paint in a very bravura fashion, the broad strokes of the clothing and background providing a contrast to the sensitively rendered face.
Young-Hunter expresses a painterly delight in the use of the medium.
JOHN YOUNG-HUNTER (1874-1955) is known for his society portraits of wealthy British and Americans, and for his Native American portraits and genre scenes of the Southwest. Young-Hunter’s work has a bravura quality and his colours are tastefully planned.
John Young-Hunter was born in Glasgow, Scotland to marine painter, Colin Hunter, and pianist, Isabella Young.
He attended Clifton College and the University of London. At the School of the Royal Academy of Arts in London he won Silver Medals and studied under John Singer Sargent, a close family friend. Lawrence Alma-Tadema was another friend of his parents, and much of Young-Hunter's early work is strongly influenced by the Pre-Raphaelites.
His wife, Mary, whom he met through his studies, also worked in the style. Young Hunter exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1900 to 1913 where his paintings received highly favorable reviews. His work also was shown at the Tate Gallery and the Luxembourg Museum in Paris. He was elected RBA in 1914. He lived at Gifford's Hall, Suffolk.
Young-Hunter had been fascinated with American Indians since attending Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show as a youth in London.
He settled in Taos, New Mexico and became a part of the colony of artists around Mabel Dodge Luhan. He died at Taos on 9 August 1955.
SIZE: 57.5 x 39 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: *Private Collection, Kent.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art. Sold in 2014
*London Private Collection.
Verso: old inventory number 14854.
£2,995

Portrait of Charles Bertie III, 1723; ...

Item Ref
8987

Oil on canvas in a George III carved and gilded gadrooned frame.
Inscribed, upper left, 'Chas. Bertie Esqr; Aetatis 19, 1723./of Uffington, in the /County of Lincoln', and with the sitter's coat of arms (showing three battering rams) and motto 'VIRTUS ARIETE FORTIOR' (Virtue is stronger than a battering ram. 'Virtue' here may also be interpreted a 'valour' or 'heroism'.)

CHARLES BERTIE III, painted here in 1723 at the age of 19, He died in 1754.
The Berties are an English aristocratic family headed by the Earl of Lindsey and Abingdon. Between 1715 and 1809 the head of the family held the title Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven. Over the centuries many members of the family were highly successful soldiers and often had an involvement in politics. Unlike his grandfather and father (both called Charles) the sitter had no interest in a parliamentary career.

CHARLES D'AGAR (1669 - 1723) came to England with his Huguenot father Jacques in 1681, settling here permanently after a stay in Copenhagen by 1691. He had a good practice, numbering such people as the Duke of Buccleuch and Lord Bolingbroke among his patrons.

SIZE: 36.5 x 32.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: By direct descent in the sitter's family to Montague Peregrine Albemarle Bertie, 12th Earl of Lindsay (1861-1938), and by descent to his daughter, Lady Muriel Felicia Vere Barclay-Harvey (1893-1980) of Ayton Castle, Berwickshire.

Verso: a torn inscription giving information on the sitter, and an old pencilled inscription on the stretcher 'No.32, 1st half-landing'.
A plaque on the frame misidentifies the sitter as Charles Bertie II, in fact that was his father.
£5,650

Double portrait of Colonel and Mrs. Adams ...

Item Ref
8854

Oil on canvas in reproduction 18th c. style gilt frame.
Inscribed, upper right, 'Col.n Sam & Rose Adams'.

A pleasing double portrait of Colonel Samuel Adams and his wife Rose, to whom he offers his snuff box for her to take a pinch. This is most unusual in portraiture.
(Snuff is a product made from ground or pulverised tobacco leaves. It originated in the Americas and was in common use in Europe by the 17th century.
It was generally inhaled or "snuffed" through the nose, usually directly from the fingers.
By the 18th century, snuff had become the tobacco product of choice among the upper classes, both male and female. The taking of snuff helped to distinguish the elite members of society from the common populace, which generally smoked its tobacco.)

PHILIPPE MERCIER (also known as Philip Mercier; 1689 in Berlin – 18 July 1760 in London) was a French painter and etcher, who lived principally and was active in England. He was born in Berlin of French extraction, the son of a Huguenot tapestry-worker. He studied painting at the Akademie der Wissenschaften of Berlin and later under Antoine Pesne, who had arrived in Berlin in 1710. Later, he travelled in Italy and France before arriving in London—"recommended by the Court at Hannover"—probably in 1716. He married in London in 1719 and lived in Leicester Fields.
He was appointed Principal Painter and librarian to the Prince and Princess of Wales at their independent establishment in Leicester Fields, and while he was in favour he painted various portraits of the royals, and no doubt many of the nobility and gentry. Of the royal portraits, those of the Prince of Wales and of his three sisters, painted in 1728, were all engraved in mezzotint by Jean Pierre Simon, and that of the three elder children of the Prince of Wales by John Faber Junior in 1744.

Mercier became involved in a scandal of sorts and he lost favour. He left London around 1740 and settled in York, where he practiced portrait painting for over ten years, before returning to London in 1751. In 1752, Mercier went to Portugal at the request of several English merchants. He did not long remain there, however, but came back to London, where he died in 1760.

SIZE: 45 x 51.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:
*Edward Abadam, Middleton Hall, Carmarthenshire, thence by descent.
*Sold Christie's 1980.
*American Private Collection.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
* Collection of a Fellow of a Cambridge College.

Verso: old inventory number; old Christie's stencil; old handwritten label "Colonel Samuel & Mrs. Adams. P. Mercier. To Christie's York from Vaughn, 102 Westbourne Ave. Hull"
£10,985