18th c. French gateleg dining table

Item Ref
8239

An unusual large 18th c. double gated dropleaf French farmhouse table in chestnut of lovely colour; probably from Gascony. The split baluster legs open as supports for the leaves. Dummy drawers at each end.

SIZE; height 32 inches, width 50 inches, depth 82 inches open (27 inches closed).
PROVENANCE; French farmhouse.
Private Collection, Hampshire.
Private Collection, North Yorkshire Dales

NOTE - PRICE DOES NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING
£3,950

James II walnut armchair c.1685.

Item Ref
9154

An elegant walnut armchair of the James II period, c.1685, tall and graceful, this was an important new stage in English chair design.
This style of cane backed and seated chairs had represented a revolution in seating comfort, but with the disadvantage of fragility.
A surprising number of these chairs still exist (they were made in their thousands) but many are now suitable only for decorative purposes as woodworm, frequent recaning, and damage to the joints and the tall backs have rendered them virtually unusable.
This is not the case with this one. This chair, over 300 years old, with its glorious sculptural quality, is not just a joy to look at but can also be used, although care should be exercised as with all chairs of this type and age.
As usual with these chairs there are signs of old woodworm, but now defunct.
The crest rail is carved with a shell … a very fashionable motif of the period ..., this, and the front rail, are deftly executed with bold cuts of the chisel. This is typical of the sort of carving performed by London chairmakers at this period, by which maximum effect is achieved with the minimum of work.
DIMENSIONS: 47 inches tall, 23 inches wide, 25 inches deep.
PROVENANCE: Herefordshire private collection for the last 25 years.
£895

Still life of Fruit, Flowers and a ...

Item Ref
9090

A large oil on canvas, painted at the turn of the 19th century, in the Dutch 17th century manner.
The painting is signed, but only the first name 'Karl' is legible. Although not yet identified, it is obvious that the artist was highly skilled, as this is a fine quality work.

Northern Renaissance artists popularized still life iconography with their flower paintings. These pieces typically show colourful flora “from different countries and even different continents in one vase and at one moment of blooming” (Metropolitan Museum of Art) and often do not feature other subject matter. These paintings rose to prominence in the early 17th century, when these artists grew increasingly interested in creating realistic studies of everyday items.

The height of still life painting came in 17th century Holland. Artists such as Jan Brueghel, Pieter Clausz, and others, painted opulent, highly detailed, and realistic images of flower bouquets and tables laden with lavish bowls of fruit and game. These paintings celebrated the seasons and reflected the era's scientific interest in the natural world. They also served as status symbols and were highly sought after.

The inclusion of parrots with still-life paintings is interesting, because it connects parrots to the material world, wealth, and trade. As an exotic creature from non-European lands, parrots were highly prized during the colonial period; and it wasn’t just the live birds that were valued, in the colonial era the plucked feathers of parrots were valued too.
SIZE: 50 x 39 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Northern England.
CONDITION: The painting has an old V-shaped damage, about 18 inches in length at its longest point; this is not visible all the time, but shows up in some angles and lights. This can be seen in the last image. Despite this, the painting is still a beautiful and highly decorative item, and is being offered at a fraction of the price it would command if undamaged. A large quality item at little cost.
£1,995

Pair of magnificent carved walnut armchairs, Dutch, ...

Item Ref
9111

There are two of these rare chairs, but they may be bought individually or as a pair. As is usual with these chairs there are signs of old woodworm activity, not now active. One is in excellent condition, firm and ready to use, with a small old repair to the back; one is equally sturdy but needs restoration to the front seat rail where old woodworm damage has caused the cane to detach. (see image 11) A fillet let into the rail and re-caning are needed, also there is a small repair to the cane in the back (not visible from the front). Thus this chair is £595, the other is £995. NOTE: red velvet cushions come with these chairs. The cushion for the chair with damage to the seat has a loose wooden seat beneath the cushion, thus the chair can be used. (See images 12-14)
Magnificent and rich, the quality and quantity of the carving is superb. Both are of excellent colour with a good patina. These chairs, with their glorious sculptural quality, are a joy to look at.

DIMENSIONS: 50 inches tall, 23 inches wide, 29 inches deep (including the rake to the backs), seat height 18 inches.
PROVENANCE: Sussex country house collection.
£1,590

Portrait of Prince Rupert, mid 17th century; ...

Item Ref
9068

Oil on canvas in a magnificent carved and gilt frame. It shows Rupert at about the age of 14 when he first became a soldier. After a pattern favoured by van Honthorst who painted Rupert, at different ages, several times. His Studio and those of his Circle produced a number of versions of van Honthorst's portraits of the senior Royalists.
Difficult to date precisely, most of these copies were produced around the middle of the 17th century, particularly during the time of the English Civil War and the King's execution in 1649. They were much in demand to adorn the private walls of Royalist supporters.

Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine, Duke of Bavaria, Duke of Cumberland, Earl of Holderness, commonly called PRINCE RUPERT OF THE RHINE, KG, PC, FRS ( 1619 – 1682), was a noted German soldier, admiral, scientist, sportsman, colonial governor and amateur artist during the 17th century. Rupert was a younger son of the German prince Frederick V, Elector Palatine and his wife Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of James I of England. Thus Rupert was the nephew of King Charles I of England, who made him Duke of Cumberland and Earl of Holderness, and the first cousin of King Charles II of England. His sister Electress Sophia was the mother of George I of Great Britain.
Prince Rupert had a varied career. He was a soldier from a young age, fighting against Spain in the Netherlands during the Eighty Years' War (1568–1648), and against the Holy Roman Emperor in Germany during the Thirty Years' War (1618–48). Aged 23, he was appointed commander of the Royalist cavalry during the English Civil War (1642–46), becoming the archetypal Cavalier of the war and ultimately the senior Royalist general. He surrendered after the fall of Bristol and was banished from England. He served under Louis XIV of France against Spain, and then as a Royalist privateer in the Caribbean. Following the Restoration, Rupert returned to England, becoming a senior British naval commander during the Second and Third Anglo-Dutch wars, engaging in scientific invention, art, and serving as the first Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company. Rupert died in England in 1682, aged 62.
Rupert is considered to have been a quick-thinking and energetic cavalry general, but ultimately undermined by his youthful impatience in dealing with his peers during the Civil War. In the Interregnum, Rupert continued the conflict against Parliament by sea from the Mediterranean to the Caribbean, showing considerable persistence in the face of adversity. As the head of the Royal Navy in his later years, he showed greater maturity and made impressive and long-lasting contributions to the Royal Navy's doctrine and development. As a colonial governor, Rupert shaped the political geography of modern Canada—Rupert's Land was named in his honour. Rupert's varied and numerous scientific and administrative interests combined with his considerable artistic skills made him one of the more colourful individuals of the Restoration period.

GERRIT VAN HONTHORST (1592 – 1656) was a Dutch Golden Age painter; born in Utrecht,
He built a considerable reputation both in the Dutch Republic and abroad. Queen Elizabeth of Bohemia, mother of Prince Rupert, sister of Charles I of England, then in exile in the Netherlands, commissioned Honthorst as a painter. Through her he became known to King Charles, who invited him to England in 1628.
After his return to Utrecht, Honthorst retained the patronage of the English monarch, painting for him, in 1631, a large picture of the king and queen of Bohemia and all their children. His popularity in the Netherlands was such that he opened a second studio in the Hague, where he painted portraits of members of the court. These were large studios, where the work of his assistants included making replicas of Honthorst's royal portraits.
SIZE: 32.5 x 28.5 inches including frame.
PROVENANCE: Wiltshire Private Collection.
£12,950

An English Ship and Other Vessels in ...

Item Ref
9161

Oil on canvas in a fine carved and giltwood 18th century frame.
A superb and accurate rendition, contemporary or nearly contemporary, of the original by Willem van de Velde the Younger, which is now in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich. It is described as being painted in the "mid 17th century to early 18th century", and continues "An English ship shown in a gale, together with other shipping. To the left is a small ship with men in the rigging shown furling the sail. In the right foreground a Dutch fishing craft known as a hoeker is bringing down her sail. In the left middle-distance is a ship with a number of figures on deck and several more in the rigging. In the right background is a ship at anchor. She has a pendant at the main and a flag at the fore. There are several other ships at anchor in the distance all riding out the storm. Although there is some blue sky immediately above the ship, the rest of the sky is filled with dark and heavy storm clouds."

WILLEM VAN DE VELDE the Younger (1633-1707) was a Dutch marine painter. son of Willem van de Velde the Elder, also a painter of sea-pieces, Willem van de Velde, the younger, was instructed by his father, and afterwards by Simon de Vlieger, a marine painter of repute at the time, and had achieved great celebrity by his art before he came to London. By 1673 he had moved to England, where he was engaged by Charles II, at a salary of £100, to aid his father in "taking and making draughts of sea-fights", his part of the work being to reproduce in colour the drawings of the elder Van de Velde. He was also patronized by the Duke of York and by various members of the nobility.
He died on 6 April 1707 in London, England, and was buried at St James's Church, Piccadilly. A memorial to him and his father lies within the church. Most of Van de Velde's finest works represent views off the coast of Holland, with Dutch shipping. His best productions are delicate, spirited and finished in handling, and correct in the drawing of the vessels and their rigging. The numerous figures are tellingly introduced, and the artist is successful in his renderings of sea, whether in calm or storm. The ships are portrayed with almost photographic accuracy, and are the most precise guides available to the appearance of 17th-century ships.
There are a number of van de Velde's marine paintings in the Wallace Collection, London, including "The Embarkation of King Charles II at Scheveningen, 1660".
SIZE: 32 x 41.25 x 2.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Collection of a Lady, Dulwich.
£6,950

Portrait of James Bishop c.1703, by Bartholomeus ...

Item Ref
9136

Oil on canvas in the original fine carved and giltwood frame. Inscribed upper left 'James Bishop. Born May 7 1690'.
James Bishop of Lower Tre-Kyninge, Cornwall, has reached the age where it is appropriate to wear the large full bottomed wig so fashionable at the time; his hand held elegantly in a pose much favoured by gentlemen and aristocrats.

The Bishops were a Cornish gentry family, possessed of several estates. However, when Anne Bishop, sole daughter and heiress of James Bishop Esq, of Lower Tre-Kyninge, married Hugh Rogers Esq, High Sheriff of Cornwall, in 1770, all Bishop possessions passed to the Rogers family.
In late 2018 Charles Rogers of Penrose House died, and in 2019 this portrait and others were sold.
This portrait is not signed by the artist, but others in the collection were, and it is obvious that the same hand was responsible. The signature was 'B. Burghende'. This was Bartholomeus van Burgindis, a Dutch artist, working from 1663-1703. He painted many of the Cornish gentry and one of his portraits is in The Royal Cornwall Museum; Dr. Nathaniel Spry, dated 1703.

SIZE: 34.5 x 29.25 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: By descent through the Bishop and Rogers families of Penrose Estate, Porthleven, Cornwall.
£4,750

Portrait of Jean Davidson, Mrs. Robertson, 18th ...

Item Ref
8910

Oil on canvas in a distressed 19th century frame.
This is a pleasing 18th century portrait of an attractive sitter with Jacobite connections.

JEAN DAVIDSON married Andrew Robertson, owner of the Scottish estate of Foveran. Jean, Countess of Dunfermline was her godmother.
Andrew's brother William was in the bodyguard of Bonnie Prince Charlie at the Battle of Culloden. After the defeat to the Jacobite forces he fled to Sweden where he made a fortune. After some years he returned and bought an estate in Scotland.
His cousin James, 5th Earl of Southesk, had been attainted for the Jacobite Rising in 1715 and the earldom was not restored until 1855.
Andrew, Jean's husband, quarrelled with their eldest son William and he left the estate of Foveran to William's brother. Alexander, William's son, as his father did not inherit the estate went to live in China where he made a fortune. Returning home he spent it all so he returned to China where he made another(moderate) fortune.
ALLAN RAMSAY 1713–1784.
Ramsay was born in Edinburgh; he studied in London at St Martin's Lane Academy and at Hans Hysing's studio, before going to Italy to study. On his return he settled in London, although he continued to be active in Edinburgh. Between 1754 and 1757 he was in Italy, mostly in Rome. During his prime period he had a virtual monopoly on court painting. He became the official painter to George III in 1760, and Principal Painter-in-Ordinary in 1767. His assistants included David Martin, Alexander Nasmyth and Philip Reinagle.
SIZE:34.25 x 29 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Dorset.
£1,850

Portrait of Benjamin Haworth c. 1750; Circle ...

Item Ref
8994

Oil on canvas in a modern reproduction frame.

The sitter, Benjamin Haworth, is shown in a pose very fashionable at that time...that of a sporting country gentleman, with his dog and fowling piece.

The Haworths were an old and influential Yorkshire family of Haworth Hall, Dunswell, Hull, Yorkshire. They were timber merchants and extensive landowners, some of them Baronets.
The Blaydes and the Booths were rich and powerful merchant families who had married into the Haworths. Like the aristocracy these wealthy merchants married within their peers, always with an eye on increasing their wealth and power.
BENJAMIN HAWORTH was born in 1728, son of Thomas Haworth (also on this website) and Mary Blaydes, daughter of Benjamin Blaydes.
Benjamin Haworth married Anne, daughter of John Booth, in 1756. Their son Benjamin Blaydes Haworth (also on this website) was born in 1763 and became Sheriff of Hull in 1813.
Benjamin died in 1798.

ALLAN RAMSAY 1713–1784.
Ramsay was born in Edinburgh. His father, also Allan Ramsay, was an important Scottish poet from whom the younger Ramsay inherited a tradition of strong nationalistic pride. Ramsay junior was instrumental in formulating a native Scottish style of painting, as his father had done for poetry.
Ramsay studied in London at St Martin's Lane Academy and at Hans Hysing's studio, before going to Italy. He worked from 1736 to 1738 at the French Academy in Rome under Francesco Imperiali and under Francesco Solimena in Naples. On his return he settled in London, although he continued to be active in Edinburgh. Between 1754 and 1757 he was in Italy, mostly in Rome. He was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1743. During his prime period he had a virtual monopoly on court painting. He became the official painter to George III in 1760, and Principal Painter-in-Ordinary in 1767. His assistants included David Martin, Alexander Nasmyth and Philip Reinagle.

SIZE: 49.75 x 41 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Haworth Hall, then by descent in the family to a branch which settled in Oxfordshire. Deceased estate.
Verso: old handwritten label identifying the sitter.
£8,650

Portrait of a Lady of the Palmer ...

Item Ref
9208

The lady is traditionally identified as a member of the Palmer family of Dorney Court, Berkshire.
The sitter, fashionably dressed in her daring 'undress', looks confidently at the viewer. This is a good example of the typical society portrait of the time and representative of Murray's best work. The use of the feigned stone oval was typical of the period.
The hand carved and gilded frame is a work of art in its own right.

THOMAS MURRAY 1663 – 1734.
He received his first lessons in art from one of the De Critz family. Subsequently he became a pupil of John Riley.
His works of before 1700 are more independent of the style of Sir Godfrey Kneller than his later portraits
Murray was successful financially. He died in June 1734, leaving no children, and bequeathed his money to a nephew, with instructions that his monument, with a bust, should be erected in Westminster Abbey, provided that it did not cost too much. His nephew, however, taking him at his word, buried him in St. Paul's, Covent Garden, and found the monument too expensive to erect.
SIZE: 34.5 x 29.5 inches including frame.
PROVENANCE: Horton Lodge, Windsor, Berkshire.
£6,350

'The Cardinal'; a pottery bust by John ...

Item Ref
9150

A superb, and rare, artwork by John Fortnum, with a very powerful presence, it is pottery, but simulating charred wood...as if the bust had been rescued from a fire, but had been subject to great heat. It is, in appearance, timeless; it could date from the Italian Renaissance and be of wood, perhaps once painted; it could be, as it is, 33 years old...it moves effortlessly through a 600 year time span. It is a free standing 'trompe l'oeil' in that it hides its true material and presents us with a wide range of perceptions.
This is a very evocative sculpture which can inspire many messages … on art, survival, religion, life, apparent damage as enhancement....truly a very thought provoking item, as well as being a glorious sculpture.

Signed and dated '86; this is number 7 of a limited edition of 8. How many others have survived the last 33 years is not known.
"My Sculpture can be seen in some of the wildest landscapes in Britain, from the North Atlantic seascapes of the Orkney Isles to the North York Moors, where I have used the wind, rain, and oxidation as natural elements in Landscape sculpture. In my smaller more intimate sculptures the human body, with its architectural and structural aspects, is an underlying theme. I am fascinated by the alchemy of heat on materials. I enjoy using different materials and experimenting with a wide range of sculptural possibilities." John Fortnum, born 1945.
SIZE: 25.5 inches tall, 20 inches wide, 12 inches deep.
PROVENANCE: London Private Collection.
£845

Double Portrait of a Lady and Gentleman ...

Item Ref
8602

Oil on canvas now mounted on board in fine period carved and giltwood frame.

This type of small scale portrait is known as a conversation piece and .."was the first real break with the stereotyped portraiture of the early 18th century. It was essentially a private rather than a public art form.
The aim of the coversation piece was to catch the sitter with family and friends in action, and Hogarth, a friend of Hayman's, succeeded extremely well at this." (Francis Hayman by Brian Allen).

Hogarth was a positive influence on Hayman as he had demonstrated that there was a good market for the small scale conversation piece.

In this portrait the male sitter has discarded his wig and wears a velvet cap of the type associated with artists, writers and other creative people. He also wears an expensive silk 'tea gown' to emphasise his relaxation at home. It is clear that the world of literature is being emphasised...a door opens onto a library, more books are on the table and the lady holds a volume with her finger marking her place.

The middle class panelled room is typical of Hayman and occurs many times in his conversation pieces and are, more often than not, a version of his own panelled studio.

FRANCIS HAYMAN R.A. (c.1708-1776) was born in Devon and painted scenery as well as genre, historical subjects and portraits. He had a successful career producing conversation pieces, theartical portraits and small full lengths through the 1740s and 50s, although he also painted on the scale of life. He helped in the foundation of the Society of Artists in 1760 and was President 1766-68; after which he became a Foundation Member of the Royal Academy, and its Librarian in 1771.
Among the pupils in his studio were Thomas Gainsborough R.A. and Nathaniel Dance R.A.

SIZE: 30 x 35 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Verso, handwritten label "Property of Major J.M.D. Wyatt, Roberstbridge House, Robertsbridge, Sussex"
The late major was the last member of the family which had connections with the D'Obrees in Guernsey.

£9,950