Portrait of an Officer, c. 1840; Studio ...

Item Ref
9238

Oil on canvas in the original gilded frame.
Portrait of an Infantry officer in undress uniform, c.1834-1848. The young sitter looks to one side as if lost in thought; his carefully tousled hair and 'mutton chop' side whiskers were the very height of fashion.

SIR FRANCIS GRANT P.R.A . (18 January 1803 – 5 October 1878) was a Scottish portrait painter who painted Queen Victoria and many distinguished British aristocratic and political figures. He served as President of the Royal Academy.
Grant was the fourth son of Francis Grant, Laird of Kilgraston, near Bridge of Earn, Perthshire, and his wife Anne Oliphant of Rossie. Grant was educated at Harrow School and Edinburgh High School.
In 1840 he exhibited an equestrian group of Queen Victoria riding with Lord Melbourne and others in Windsor Park, and became the fashionable portrait-painter of the day. His portrait of Lady Glenlyon, exhibited in 1842, increased his reputation, and for nearly 40 years graceful portraits in the Royal Academy exhibitions came from his studio.

Elected an associate of the Royal Academy in 1842, Grant in 1851 became an Academician. In 1866, on the death of Charles Eastlake, Edwin Landseer turned down the seat of Academy President, and Grant was elected instead. He was knighted that year.
After some years of gradually failing health, Grant died of heart disease suddenly at his residence, The Lodge, Melton Mowbray, on 5 October 1878, and was interred in the Anglican cemetery, his relations having declined the usual honour of burial in St Paul's Cathedral. His funeral was conducted by the Archbishop of York on 12 October and many of the leading British artists attended, including Edward John Poynter, Edward Armitage, Thomas Woolner, Philip Hermogenes Calderon, and the American Albert Bierstadt.

SIZE: 40 x 34.25 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Dorset Private Collection.

SOLD

Alabaster Bust of Louise De La Valliere ...

Item Ref
8904

A beautiful Art Nouveau bust of Louis de La Valliere.
Although Louise lived in the 17th century, the Italian sculptor Vittorio Pochini has chosen to depict her wearing a head-dress of the Renaissance period, her eyes modestly downcast. Although Louise became the mistress of the French king she was not a promiscuous woman and was deeply religious.
The name 'DE LA VALLIERE' is cut into the base.
The bust shows signs of its age with some surface cracks and some small abrasions but is still an item of great beauty.

Louise de La Vallière (Françoise Louise de La Baume Le Blanc; 6 August 1644 – 7 June 1710) was a mistress of Louis XIV of France from 1661 to 1667. She later became the Duchess of La Vallière and Duchess of Vaujours in her own right.
Louise was born in Tours, the daughter of an officer, Laurent de La Baume Le Blanc (who took the name of La Vallière from a small estate near Amboise) and Françoise Le Provost. Laurent de La Vallière died in 1651; his widow remarried in 1655, to Jacques de Courtarvel, marquis de Saint-Rémy, and joined the court of Gaston, Duke of Orléans, at Blois.

Louise was brought up with the younger princesses (the future Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Duchess of Alençon, and Duchess of Savoy), the half-sisters of La Grande Mademoiselle. After the death of Gaston, Duke of Orléans, his widow moved with her daughters to the Luxembourg Palace in Paris and took the sixteen-year-old Louise with them.

Louise had been at Fontainebleau only two months when she and Louis XIV fell in love, becoming the king's mistress. It was Louise's first serious attachment and she was reportedly an innocent, religious-minded girl who initially brought neither coquetry nor self-interest to their secret relationship. She was not extravagant and was not interested in money or titles that could come from her situation; she wanted only the King's love. She bore the king five children.
By 1667 Louis had tired of her and taken other mistresses; after much pleading to the monarch she was finally permitted to enter the Carmelite convent in the Faubourg Saint-Jacques in Paris under the name of Sister Louise of Mercy. She died, a nun, in 1710.


SIZE: 16.5 inches tall (42 cms)
PROVENANCE: Norris Castle.(Image 7)
NORRIS CASTLE is located on the Isle of Wight and can be seen from the Solent standing on the northeast point of East Cowes. The castle was designed by James Wyatt for Lord Henry Seymour. It has a mediaeval facade with crenellations, but all of this is for show as the castle has no defensive fortifications. The building's original function was entertaining.
King George IV visited the castle in 1819, and the future Queen Victoria with her mother the Duchess of Kent in 1831. Queen Victoria later purchased Osborne House, which is the next estate to the east.
In the second half of the twentieth century the castle was opened to the public; it is now closed.



SOLD

Inlaid and carved oak wainscot chair c.1650 ...

Item Ref
9146

This is a fine piece of furniture, every bit as usable now as when it was made. It has the characteristics of a Yorkshire chair, Leeds area. The two panelled back, with superb carving, is typical of 1630-40, but the two applied mouldings are of a type fashionable in the 1650s and later. The Northern counties were very conservative and these wainscot chairs were made there long after those further south had ceased their production.

This chair is of excellent quality but constant use over the centuries has inevitably left its marks.
As these once high status chairs became unfashionable in the 18th century they moved down from gentry houses to farmers and small merchants then into cottages.
This example shows all the signs of constant use, being used almost to the point of extinction and needing considerable repair.
From the late 18th into the 19th century a fashion for mediaevalism and antiquarianism began and flourished, started by 'The Castle of Otranto' and encouraged by Sir Walter Scott's hugely successful writings.
Furniture that had been discarded was sought and restored. All this history is shown in this chair... some parts have been skilfully replaced or repaired. Although not one for the purist collector this is a fine chair with a long story to tell...and it is sturdy enough to last at least another 350 years.
It is priced at a fraction of the cost of an untouched chair of this type.

DIMENSIONS: 45 inches tall x 23.5 inches wide x 22 inches deep.
PROVENANCE: Bristol private collection.
SOLD

Bristol delft bowl c.1760.

Item Ref
9179

A unusual and attractive Bristol delft shallow bowl (or dish) c.1760, painted with a Chinoiserie river scene in shades of blue, manganese and green.
In excellent condition with only slight 'nibbles' to the rim.
SIZE: 8.75 inches diameter; 1.75 inches tall.
PROVENANCE: The Collection of Sir William Whitfield CBE, St Helen Hall, County Durham. (Image 4)
SOLD

Portrait of a Gentleman c.1650; Circle of ...

Item Ref
8828

: Oil in canvas in good 17th c. style Dutch ripple-edged frame.
Centre right the later applied signature and date 'C.J. 1653'
An excellent portrait typical of Johnson and his Circle; expensively dressed but without pretension, the sitter looks not at us, but to one side as if lost in thought.
He is depicted within the feigned oval often used by Johnson and his admirers.
Hir silk clothing and fine lace are indications of his wealth and status and are carefully depicted.
In a period when black clothing was the fashion artists strove to depict the different nuances and textures of the fabrics as convincingly as possible.
They found that black is an ideal background with which to contrast the crisp white linen and rich lace and this dramatically accentuates the face and hand gestures. This extreme opposition between black and white is both austere and exciting, and is a characteristic feature of portraiture of this period.
CORNELIUS JOHNSON (Jonson, Jansen, Van Ceulen) 1593-1661 was born in London, the son of Flemish emigres.
Although Waterhouse thought he was trained in Holland it seems more likely (as Collins Baker has it) that Marcus Gheeraerts was his master in London.
Johnson is the most satisfying and 'English' of the portraitists working in England in the 1620s and 30s. He has a fine technique with a restrained and introspective style, with careful attention to the costume details.
His accurate portraits are never flattering but a sober and objective portrayal of his usual sitters: the gentry and lesser nobility. His style, and that of his Circle of course, is easily identified by its coolness and restraint.
In 1632 he was made Painter to the King, but his wife's fears of the approaching Civil War caused him to retire to Holland in 1643. He continued to paint for the rest of his life, but was reportedly ruined by the extravagance of his second wife and died a poor man in Utrecht in 1661.
SIZE: 28 x 21 75 inches canvas size
36 x 29.5 inches inc. frame
PROVENANCE:*English Private Collection.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
*Collection of an internationally known European theatrical costume designer.
SOLD

Portrait of Louise de La Valliere; Follower ...

Item Ref
8906

Oil on canvas in a giltwood frame.
Based very closely on the 17th century portrait by Pierre Mignard (the only major difference being the left arm), this is an 18th century small scale portrait of one of the most famous lovers of Louis XIV.
The talented unknown artist has painted this portrait with a miniaturists skill; the detail is superb.

LOUISE DE LA VALLIERE (Françoise Louise de La Baume Le Blanc; 6 August 1644 – 7 June 1710) was a mistress of Louis XIV of France from 1661 to 1667. She later became the Duchess of La Vallière and Duchess of Vaujours in her own right.
Louise was born in Tours, the daughter of an officer, Laurent de La Baume Le Blanc (who took the name of La Vallière from a small estate near Amboise) and Françoise Le Provost. Laurent de La Vallière died in 1651; his widow remarried in 1655, to Jacques de Courtarvel, marquis de Saint-Rémy, and joined the court of Gaston, Duke of Orléans, at Blois.

Louise was brought up with the younger princesses (the future Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Duchess of Alençon, and Duchess of Savoy), the half-sisters of La Grande Mademoiselle. After the death of Gaston, Duke of Orléans, his widow moved with her daughters to the Luxembourg Palace in Paris and took the sixteen-year-old Louise with them.

Louise had been at Fontainebleau only two months when she and Louis XIV fell in love, becoming the king's mistress. It was Louise's first serious attachment and she was reportedly an innocent, religious-minded girl who initially brought neither coquetry nor self-interest to their secret relationship. She was not extravagant and was not interested in money or titles that could come from her situation; she wanted only the King's love. She bore the king five children.
By 1667 Louis had tired of her and taken other mistresses; after much pleading to the monarch she was finally permitted to enter the Carmelite convent in the Faubourg Saint-Jacques in Paris under the name of Sister Louise of Mercy. She died, a nun, in 1710.

PIERRE MIGNARD (1612-1695) was a member of a family of artists, he was a painter in the classical French Baroque manner, known primarily for his court portraits.

In 1635 Mignard left the studio of Simon Vouet for Italy, where he spent 22 years and made a reputation that brought him a summons to Paris in 1657. Successful with his portrait of Louis XIV and in favour with the court, Mignard pitted himself against Charles Le Brun; he declined to enter the French Royal Academy, of which Le Brun was the head, and he organized the opposition to its authority.
Mignard was chiefly active in portraiture; many of the beauties and celebrities of his day sat for him, including Molière, the Viscount de Turenne, Jacques Bossuet, the Marquise de Maintenon, the Marquise de Sévigné, the Duchesse de La Valliere and the Marquise de Montespan. His skilful technique and graceful arrangements are noteworthy.

SIZE: 19 x 15 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Norris Castle, Isle of Wight (see image 8)
SOLD

SOLD....Portrait of a gentleman of the ...

Item Ref
8656

Oil on canvas in carved and giltwood 17th c. frame.

This charming naive portrait of a young gentleman and a warship poses some intriguing questions.
It dates from the end of the 17th century as is shown by the gentleman's clothing and the style of the stern of the vessel.
Painted on the stern, amongst the carved gilt 'gingerbreading', can be seen the coat of arms of the Rolt family.

The sitter gestures towards a pair of shipbuilder's dividers, a globe in the background.
The Pett family of Kent were famous shipbuilders for centuries and were cousins of the Rolt family of Bedfordshire, who were related to the Orlebars of Hinwick House, Bedfordshire.

This portrait hung for many years at Hinwick, but its true date, sitter and the name of the ship of the line depicted were all lost, and curiously it was said in the Hinwick House guide that the ship was Sir Francis Drake's Golden Hind and that the sitter was Sir Peter Pett, Master Shipwright to Elizabeth I.
There were four families of Petts involved with shipbuilding and sailing.
In the 17th century it was said of the family that they were "so knit together that the Devil himself could not discover them". 'The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815' by N.A.M. Rodger.

Could this portrait commemorate the building of a ship of the line by a Pett for a Rolt? The vessel does carry the Rolt arms on its stern and it flies the long red pendant of a private ship of the Red Squadron of the Battle Fleet that was used in the second half of the 17th century, and the sitter points towards shipwright's dividers.

The painting hung at the time the guide was written in the Staircase Hall then, in recent times, on the west wall by the turret door.

VERSO: a fragmentary handwritten label in copperplate script:-
'Richard...........of.......owner.......builder......
Blackes....Richar.....should....................'

SIZE: 51 25 x 41.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Hinwick House, Bedfordshire.

SOLD

SOLD....Portrait of a Lady c.1660 (possibly Anne ...

Item Ref
8397

Oil on canvas in reproduction frame of appropriate type and period.

A charming portrait of an attractive lady with a direct but modest gaze.
The artist strongly influenced by Mytens, especially in the rendering of the shimmering silk dress.

It is possible that this is Lady Anne Lindsay (born before 1638) who was the daughter of John Lindsay, 17th Earl of Crawford, and Lady Margaret Hamilton. She married John Leslie, 1st Duke of Rothes, and had two daughters.
The Duchess was a Presbyterian and favoured the doctrines of the Covenanters.
A portrait by David Scougall of the Duchess in later years exists.

(Our thanks to Aileen Munro-Cameron for help with the above)

JAN MYTENS (1614-1670) worked in The Hague as a portrait painter for over thirty years painting those loyal to the House of Orange as well as a number of British visitors. His work was much admired and he was very influential in Dutch portraiture.

SIZE: 26 x 21 inches canvas size; 32 x 27 inches inc. frame.

Verso: three old labels.
PROVENANCE:
Collection of Mrs. John Harrison Jr. (Exhib.1957)
Newman Galleries, Philadelphia
A private collection
SOLD

Portrait of a Lady c.1780; Circle of ...

Item Ref
8954

Oil on canvas in a fine quality and elaborate gilded composition frame.

The sitter wears the new, more relaxed clothing of the time; her hair is powdered grey, a style made 'a la mode' by Georgina, Duchess of Devonshire.
Hoppner developed an individual style that is distinguished by vivacity and a strong feeling of character, here shown in this informal portrait by a Member of his Circle. These works show a deliberate move away from the classicism of Reynolds, towards a more emotionally engaging and naturalistic image. Hoppner’s success is evident by the fact that he became the only serious rival to Lawrence, and with him was responsible for painting the finest Romantic portraits of the Regency period.

With Gainsborough and Reynolds, JOHN HOPPNER (1758 - 1810) was one of the leading portrait painters in late eighteenth-century Britain. He entered the Royal Academy Schools in 1775, where he won a Gold Medal in 1782. His rapid rise was accompanied by rumours (never denied by Hoppner) that he was the illegitimate son of the future King George III, and it is true that in his education and early career Hoppner benefited from a considerable degree of royal sponsorship. He was brought up as a child of the Chapel Royal, tutored in the Royal Library where King George paid great attention to his progress, and finally presented him with an allowance in order that he might establish himself as a painter.

By the late 1780s Hoppner was a regular contributor to the Royal Academy exhibitions and quickly established himself as a fashionable portrait painter. In 1789 he succeeded Reynolds in his appointment as painter to the Prince of Wales in 1789, many of whose circle he painted.

SIZE: 37 x 31 x 1.75 inches including frame.
PROVENANCE: Sussex Private Collection.
VERSO: an old label dated 1911, numbering the painting No.8 in an insurance schedule.


SOLD

Portrait of Mary Bagot, Countess of Falmouth ...

Item Ref
8868

Oil on canvas in early 18th century gilded frame.

This lovely small painting is an early 19th century copy, reduced in size, of the life size original by Sir Peter Lely which is in The Royal Collection. The unknown artist has captured the spirit and style of the Lely original on a small scale...a rare talent.

Lely's portrait forms one of the ‘Windsor Beauties’ series, a set of eleven portraits of celebrated women at the Restoration court painted by him. The series was apparently commissioned or at least assembled by Anne Hyde, Duchess of York, probably around 1662-5. Pepys recorded on 21 August 1668 that he ‘did first see the Duke of York’s room of pictures of some Maids of Honour, done by Lilly: good, but not like.’ By describing the pictures as ‘not like’ Pepys is alluding to the often noted opinion that Lely flattered his subjects, and gave each portrait a similar languorous and ‘sleepy eyed’ air, said to have been influenced by the features of the noted court beauty Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, who was painted many times by Lely.


MARY BAGOT, Countess of Falmouth and Dorset (1645 – 1679) was a British courtier. Her portrait by Lely was erroneously named "Elizabeth, Countess of Falmouth" and also as "Countess of Ossory" in some portrait prints and books in the 18th and 19th centuries, many of which were later reprinted, compounding the error.
Her father was Col. Henry Bagot, and mother was Dorothea Arden, gentry greatly impoverished by supporting Charles I and by Cromwellian fines.
Aged 19 she married Charles Berkeley, 1st Earl of Falmouth in 1663. After only six months he was killed on board 'The Royal Charles' fighting the Dutch at the Battle of Lowestoft.

Mary then married Charles Sackville, 6th Earl of Dorset in June 1674, dying in childbirth after five years of marriage.

SIR PETER LELY (1618 - 1680) was the most important portraitist in the reign of Charles ll, although he had painted portraits throughout the Commonwealth. Dutch born as Pieter van der Faes, he became Principal Painter to the King, painting everyone of importance and maintaining a busy and active Studio to help with the huge demand for his portraits.

SIZE: 19.5 x 17 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Buckinghamshire.

SOLD

SOLD.....Portrait of a Young Lady c. 1765; ...

Item Ref
8459

Oil on canvas in a good carved and giltwood frame, modern but of the correct 18th c. French style.

The sitter, a beautiful young French lady, is dressed in the height of fashion for an outdoor stroll. She leans on a stone balustrade whilst holding roses...the symbol of youth, beauty and love, but also a symbol of time and how quickly it passes.
One rose is still little more than a bud, as if to say that the girl has yet to bloom into her full mature beauty...time is still on her side.
The sitter looks confidently, almost provocatively, at the viewer; secure in her wealth and youth.

This is an attractive portrait extremely well painted...the treatment of the silks, lace and the youthful flesh tones are very accomplished.

FRANCOIS-HUBERT DROUAIS (1727-1775) trained under Boucher and was strongly influenced by his style; he became a rival to Nattier as a fashionable portraitist. His portraits have a gracious and slightly artificial charm redolent of the French Court.
Painting mainly the aristocracy, he was particularly successful with children, but his best known portrait is probably that of Madame de Pompadour, mistress to Louis XV.

SIZE: 34 x 30.5 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE: Private Collection.
SOLD

Portrait of Lady Antrobus and her Son ...

Item Ref
9005

Oil on canvas in a gilt frame. Signed lower right; 'Loder, Bath.'
A plaque on the frame is inscribed 'Lady Antrobus and Son at Ottershaw Park, Surrey. James Loder.' and the incorrect birth and death dates for Loder 'c1800 - c1865'.

This is a particularly enchanting painting depicting Lady Antrobus and, most likely, her eldest son Edmund, later the 4th Baronet; presumably the small dog to the right was a favourite pet. The riders are shown outside Ottershaw Park, which belonged to the extremely wealthy Richard Crayshaw who had bought the estate in 1842.

Lady Antrobus was born Marianne Georgia Dashwood, daughter of Sir George Dashwood 4th Bart. and Marianne Sarah Rowley, Lady Dashwood in 1822. In 1847 she married Sir Edmund Antrobus, 3rd Bart. DL. JP. High Sheriff of Wiltshire in 1880, MA Cantab, MP East Surrey from 1841-7 and for Wilton 1855-77. He was born 1818, died 1899. Sir Edmund was the eldest son of Sir Edmund, 2nd Baronet, of Antrobus Hall, Cheshire and Amesbury, Wiltshire. The union had produced six children. Amongst the Antrobus possessions was the ancient site, Stonehenge.

The Antrobus family was an ancient one, originally from Cheshire, but their principal seat Antrobus Hall was sold to Thomas Venables Esquire in 1460. It was later, in 1808, repurchased by the the Antrobus family. Demolished in 1980.

Lady Antrobus died in 1903 and is buried at the Church of St Mary and St Melor, Amesbury, Wiltshire. Her son Edmund, the boy in the painting, was born in 1848 and died in 1915.

JAMES LODER (1784-1860) was known as 'Loder of Bath', did not exhibit in London but was well known as a local painter of horses and sporting groups. He lived and worked in Bath at the end of the Georgian and into the Victorian era, though his style is firmly rooted into the earlier style. Some of his pictures were aquatinted by G. Hunt.

SIZE: 27 x 34 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, North of England.
SOLD